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Sem Hartz and the making of Linotype Juliana

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[Sem Hartz (1912-95) grew up in an artistic, Jewish environment. As an apprentice engraver he joined Joh. Enschedé en Zonen in Haarlem in 1936. For this firm he would design many bank notes and postage stamps, including the definitive stamps showing the head of queen Juliana. At Enschedé's he made friends with the aesthetic consultant Jan van Krimpen, an internationally renowned book and type designer.

As a person in hiding Hartz would survive the Second World War. During this period the versatile Hartz had begun to train himself in writing, drawing and designing letters. In the early fifties he started work on the Juliana. This economical text face was released in 1958 by the English manufacturer of composing machines Linotype and has been applied in many Penguin paperbacks. In this contribution the history of the development of the Juliana is explored, particularly on the basis of the S.L. Hartz Collection in the Amsterdam University Library., Sem Hartz (1912-95) grew up in an artistic, Jewish environment. As an apprentice engraver he joined Joh. Enschedé en Zonen in Haarlem in 1936. For this firm he would design many bank notes and postage stamps, including the definitive stamps showing the head of queen Juliana. At Enschedé's he made friends with the aesthetic consultant Jan van Krimpen, an internationally renowned book and type designer.

As a person in hiding Hartz would survive the Second World War. During this period the versatile Hartz had begun to train himself in writing, drawing and designing letters. In the early fifties he started work on the Juliana. This economical text face was released in 1958 by the English manufacturer of composing machines Linotype and has been applied in many Penguin paperbacks. In this contribution the history of the development of the Juliana is explored, particularly on the basis of the S.L. Hartz Collection in the Amsterdam University Library.]

10.1163/157006906778163356
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/content/journals/10.1163/157006906778163356
2006-08-01
2017-04-27

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