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Les Wierix illustrateurs de la Bible dite de Natalis

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[After lengthy negotiations the Jesuits in Rome commissioned the Wierix brothers to execute the plates (except for about twenty, which were donc by Hans and Adriaen Collaert and Charles de Mallery) which were to illustrate the Adnotationes et Meditationes by Geronimo Nadal (Hieronymus Natalis), a pupil of St. Ignatius. In fact the 153 plates first appeared as an album without text in 1593, under its own title Evangelicae Historiae Imagines, and in this form they were again published in 1596 and 1647. The Adnotationes did not appear until 1594, after which they were republished in 1595, 1607 and 1707. There are numerous variant versions, including some without vignettes, some with a few, and some with the whole séries. A translation into Italian appeared in 1599, while French and German translations remained unpublished. Some sixty copper plates were used for the illustration of the Mystica Ciudad de Dios by Maria de Jesus de Agreda, published by the widow Verdussen in 1736. All the plates are now preserved in the Trappist monastery at Westmalle. A group of 126 plates (taken from the 137 engraved by the Wierix brothers themselves) were engraved and published in Paris during the seventeenth century by the widow Joron, by J.-B. Loyson, by N. Belley and possibly by E. du Castin. Christoffel van Sichem cut about forty xylographic copies chosen from the last fifty plates of the album. Even as late as the nineteenth century the plates were reproduced several times; 130 of them were also copied as steel engravings. At a very early stage albums of the Evangelicae Historiae Imagines were sent to missionaries in the Far East, where they served as models for paintings and, above all, for woodcuts. In Europe, too, the plates were a source of inspiration for painters, even for Philippe de Champaigne, whose 'Canaanite woman' in the Carmelite convent of Faubourg Saint-Jacques in Paris is, except for the buildings, a detailed copy of plate 61. The subjects of the panels which two Jesuits executed on the confessionals in the church of St. Fedele in Milan were taken directly from 24 of the first 37 plates in the Evangelicae Historiae Imagines, very soon after the publication of the album, which itself enjoyed very considerable success. By the gathering and co-ordination of many widely dispersed and little-known (or completely unknown) data, it has proved possible to fill many lacunae and to rectify numerous mistakes., After lengthy negotiations the Jesuits in Rome commissioned the Wierix brothers to execute the plates (except for about twenty, which were donc by Hans and Adriaen Collaert and Charles de Mallery) which were to illustrate the Adnotationes et Meditationes by Geronimo Nadal (Hieronymus Natalis), a pupil of St. Ignatius. In fact the 153 plates first appeared as an album without text in 1593, under its own title Evangelicae Historiae Imagines, and in this form they were again published in 1596 and 1647. The Adnotationes did not appear until 1594, after which they were republished in 1595, 1607 and 1707. There are numerous variant versions, including some without vignettes, some with a few, and some with the whole séries. A translation into Italian appeared in 1599, while French and German translations remained unpublished. Some sixty copper plates were used for the illustration of the Mystica Ciudad de Dios by Maria de Jesus de Agreda, published by the widow Verdussen in 1736. All the plates are now preserved in the Trappist monastery at Westmalle. A group of 126 plates (taken from the 137 engraved by the Wierix brothers themselves) were engraved and published in Paris during the seventeenth century by the widow Joron, by J.-B. Loyson, by N. Belley and possibly by E. du Castin. Christoffel van Sichem cut about forty xylographic copies chosen from the last fifty plates of the album. Even as late as the nineteenth century the plates were reproduced several times; 130 of them were also copied as steel engravings. At a very early stage albums of the Evangelicae Historiae Imagines were sent to missionaries in the Far East, where they served as models for paintings and, above all, for woodcuts. In Europe, too, the plates were a source of inspiration for painters, even for Philippe de Champaigne, whose 'Canaanite woman' in the Carmelite convent of Faubourg Saint-Jacques in Paris is, except for the buildings, a detailed copy of plate 61. The subjects of the panels which two Jesuits executed on the confessionals in the church of St. Fedele in Milan were taken directly from 24 of the first 37 plates in the Evangelicae Historiae Imagines, very soon after the publication of the album, which itself enjoyed very considerable success. By the gathering and co-ordination of many widely dispersed and little-known (or completely unknown) data, it has proved possible to fill many lacunae and to rectify numerous mistakes.]

10.1163/157006976X00144
/content/journals/10.1163/157006976x00144
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1976-01-01
2016-12-03

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