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Zu der sog. 'Antwerpener' Holzschnittserie in der niederländischen Tradition von Sebastian Brants Narrenschiff

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[There is no doubt that the elements most responsible for the popularity of Sebastian Brant's The Ship of Fools include the illustrations. Their location between motto and text clearly indicates the important role they play in each chapter. Hitherto almost all the interest shown in the illustrations has been devoted to the woodcuts in the Basle editions and their connection with Albrecht Dürer. By contrast, little attention has been paid to the illustrations in the pirated and interpolated editions. Only the woodcuts in the Dutch versions have been studied at any length. In this article on the various sets of woodcuts used to illustrate the Dutch translations printed during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Paris, Antwerp, Leiden and Amsterdam, particular attention is paid to the 'anonymous' set of woodcuts which first appears, already worn by repeated use, in a number of Antwerp editions dating from the sixteenth century. A study of these reveals hitherto unknown connections within the Dutch tradition which once again show the importance of including typographical evidence in work on early editions. Furthermore, drawing on the evidence of these 'anonymous' woodcuts from the 1548 Antwerp edition, a strong case is made for the existence of a much earlier Latin edition of The Ship o f Fools, probably printed in Germany and to date unrecorded., There is no doubt that the elements most responsible for the popularity of Sebastian Brant's The Ship of Fools include the illustrations. Their location between motto and text clearly indicates the important role they play in each chapter. Hitherto almost all the interest shown in the illustrations has been devoted to the woodcuts in the Basle editions and their connection with Albrecht Dürer. By contrast, little attention has been paid to the illustrations in the pirated and interpolated editions. Only the woodcuts in the Dutch versions have been studied at any length. In this article on the various sets of woodcuts used to illustrate the Dutch translations printed during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Paris, Antwerp, Leiden and Amsterdam, particular attention is paid to the 'anonymous' set of woodcuts which first appears, already worn by repeated use, in a number of Antwerp editions dating from the sixteenth century. A study of these reveals hitherto unknown connections within the Dutch tradition which once again show the importance of including typographical evidence in work on early editions. Furthermore, drawing on the evidence of these 'anonymous' woodcuts from the 1548 Antwerp edition, a strong case is made for the existence of a much earlier Latin edition of The Ship o f Fools, probably printed in Germany and to date unrecorded.]

10.1163/157006981X00030
/content/journals/10.1163/157006981x00030
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/content/journals/10.1163/157006981x00030
1981-01-01
2016-12-07

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