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Spaanse boekbanden te Brussel Beschouwingen en kanttekeningen naar aanleiding van een tentoonstelling

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[This article was prompted by a magnificent exhibition in the Bibliotheca Wittockiana in Brussels, held at the end of 1985 (as part of Europalia 85 Espana) and accompanied by a pitifully unsubstantial catalogue. Twenty manuscripts from the twelfth to the twentieth century and twenty-two printed works in Spanish bindings in various styles made up an attractive whole even if they hardly provided a representative survey. It was the specific character and importance of these bindings which induced the authors of the present study to assemble further information on a selection of the pieces described and to discuss it against a more substantial background. In many respects the most interesting feature of the exhibition were the so-called mudejar bindings. Inspired by Islamic bindings they are chiefly characterised by the geometrical strap-work (entrelac) and the small tools resembling pieces of cord. An Arabic design is here combined with a European binding technique. The number of different patterns in this exhibition alone has led to the following classification of mudejar binding designs: (1) frames on their own; (2) central rosette; (3) two frames one above the other; (4) the same with a central rosette; (5) the most intricate geometrical strap-work. The mudejar binding style can be dated between the thirteenth and the sixteenth century and was probably of decisive significance for the development of one of the most typical binding decorations in Europe, the entrelac. Almost the entire collection of mudejar bindings shown came from the library of the Cathedral of Segovia. From a later date there were the fan bindings (from the second half of the sixteenth to the late eighteenth century) and the cortina bindings (early nineteenth century), both of Spanish origin. As far as the former type of binding is concerned it is certain that the exhibition displayed by far the earliest known example of this style. Finally there were a few heraldic bindings dating from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The most noteworthy was a binding for De Guzman, a copy with large plate stamps. An inventory is at present being made of the thirteen known Guzman bindings (cat. 34). The content of a number of bindings was also worth closer examination. Briefly, these were incunables, especially from Basel, from the property of Diego de Miranda, canon of Burgos and adviser to Ferdinand and Isabella, the Catholic Kings (one of them contains an initial with the painted portrait of Isabella, before or not later than 1479-cat. 9, 10) and three printed works from the property of Juan Arias Dávila, humanist and bishop of Segovia, which are among the first books to have been printed in Spain (one of these was the Sinodal which can be attributed to the German printer Johannes Parix de Heydelberga in Segovia in 1472-cat. 16, 17). The bindings can only be described in technical terms. Since these are so necessary to us in our own language and since this article has provided us with a welcome opportunity to give more detailed descriptions as correctly and precisely as possible in a scientifically responsible Dutch, the authors wanted this article to appear in Dutch. Nobody can object to scholarly work being published in one's own language. In this respect the Nederlandse Bandengenootschap which was set up three years ago plays an incontestably important part. This society, with Dr Jos M. M. Hermans (State University of Groningen) as chairman and Dr Jan Storm van Leeuwen (Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague) as secretary, applies itself to research into and study of bookbindings preserved in the Low Countries. The Bandengenootschap considers to be one of its principal tasks the establishing of a correct terminology of bookbinding in Dutch and to this end a sub-committee has been appointed., This article was prompted by a magnificent exhibition in the Bibliotheca Wittockiana in Brussels, held at the end of 1985 (as part of Europalia 85 Espana) and accompanied by a pitifully unsubstantial catalogue. Twenty manuscripts from the twelfth to the twentieth century and twenty-two printed works in Spanish bindings in various styles made up an attractive whole even if they hardly provided a representative survey. It was the specific character and importance of these bindings which induced the authors of the present study to assemble further information on a selection of the pieces described and to discuss it against a more substantial background. In many respects the most interesting feature of the exhibition were the so-called mudejar bindings. Inspired by Islamic bindings they are chiefly characterised by the geometrical strap-work (entrelac) and the small tools resembling pieces of cord. An Arabic design is here combined with a European binding technique. The number of different patterns in this exhibition alone has led to the following classification of mudejar binding designs: (1) frames on their own; (2) central rosette; (3) two frames one above the other; (4) the same with a central rosette; (5) the most intricate geometrical strap-work. The mudejar binding style can be dated between the thirteenth and the sixteenth century and was probably of decisive significance for the development of one of the most typical binding decorations in Europe, the entrelac. Almost the entire collection of mudejar bindings shown came from the library of the Cathedral of Segovia. From a later date there were the fan bindings (from the second half of the sixteenth to the late eighteenth century) and the cortina bindings (early nineteenth century), both of Spanish origin. As far as the former type of binding is concerned it is certain that the exhibition displayed by far the earliest known example of this style. Finally there were a few heraldic bindings dating from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The most noteworthy was a binding for De Guzman, a copy with large plate stamps. An inventory is at present being made of the thirteen known Guzman bindings (cat. 34). The content of a number of bindings was also worth closer examination. Briefly, these were incunables, especially from Basel, from the property of Diego de Miranda, canon of Burgos and adviser to Ferdinand and Isabella, the Catholic Kings (one of them contains an initial with the painted portrait of Isabella, before or not later than 1479-cat. 9, 10) and three printed works from the property of Juan Arias Dávila, humanist and bishop of Segovia, which are among the first books to have been printed in Spain (one of these was the Sinodal which can be attributed to the German printer Johannes Parix de Heydelberga in Segovia in 1472-cat. 16, 17). The bindings can only be described in technical terms. Since these are so necessary to us in our own language and since this article has provided us with a welcome opportunity to give more detailed descriptions as correctly and precisely as possible in a scientifically responsible Dutch, the authors wanted this article to appear in Dutch. Nobody can object to scholarly work being published in one's own language. In this respect the Nederlandse Bandengenootschap which was set up three years ago plays an incontestably important part. This society, with Dr Jos M. M. Hermans (State University of Groningen) as chairman and Dr Jan Storm van Leeuwen (Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague) as secretary, applies itself to research into and study of bookbindings preserved in the Low Countries. The Bandengenootschap considers to be one of its principal tasks the establishing of a correct terminology of bookbinding in Dutch and to this end a sub-committee has been appointed.]

10.1163/157006987X00089
/content/journals/10.1163/157006987x00089
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/content/journals/10.1163/157006987x00089
1987-01-01
2016-12-03

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