Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The printer's device of the Elzeviers in Hungary

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Quaerendo

[The author tries to answer the question how and why the characteristic printer's device which the Leiden Elzeviers used from 1620 onward-the emblem representing a tree and a man and the motto 'Non Solus'-came to be used by seventeenth-and eighteenth-century Hungarian printing-offices. Abraham Szenci Kertész from Várad was the first to do so, in 1650; the Press of the Reformed Church College at Kolozsvár (Klausenburg) used it as late as 1794. Although the phenomenon of the printer's device was not widespread in seventeenth-century Hungary, it appears to occur more frequently from about 1650. The author has traced 27 publications from eight different printers, which have one of the three known variants of the `Non Solus' emblem as printer's device on the title-page. Having analysed the activities of the Hungarian printers who used the device, the author argues that its frequent occurrence was probably due to the fact that these Hungarian printers, who not only sympathised with Puritanism, but also strove to improve the quality of their printing, saw these emblems as symbols of Puritan thought., The author tries to answer the question how and why the characteristic printer's device which the Leiden Elzeviers used from 1620 onward-the emblem representing a tree and a man and the motto 'Non Solus'-came to be used by seventeenth-and eighteenth-century Hungarian printing-offices. Abraham Szenci Kertész from Várad was the first to do so, in 1650; the Press of the Reformed Church College at Kolozsvár (Klausenburg) used it as late as 1794. Although the phenomenon of the printer's device was not widespread in seventeenth-century Hungary, it appears to occur more frequently from about 1650. The author has traced 27 publications from eight different printers, which have one of the three known variants of the `Non Solus' emblem as printer's device on the title-page. Having analysed the activities of the Hungarian printers who used the device, the author argues that its frequent occurrence was probably due to the fact that these Hungarian printers, who not only sympathised with Puritanism, but also strove to improve the quality of their printing, saw these emblems as symbols of Puritan thought.]

10.1163/157006991X00093
/content/journals/10.1163/157006991x00093
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157006991x00093
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/157006991x00093
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157006991x00093
1991-01-01
2016-12-04

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Quaerendo — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation