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Full Access Genesis 1-3: Augustine and Origen on the coats of skins

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Genesis 1-3: Augustine and Origen on the coats of skins

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AbstractThis paper explores Origen’s and Augustine’s interpretations of Gen. 3,21, which regards the coats of skins that God gave to Adam and Eve after they had sinned. I propose the notion of man’s “state of intermediateness” as a basis for examining both authors’ understanding of the skin tunics, and for revealing the similarities and distinctive dissimilarities in their interpretations. I also investigate how Origen’s and Augustine’s different readings of the two accounts of man’s creation, in Gen. 1,27 and Gen. 2,7, can be connected with their understanding of Gen. 3,21. I conclude by showing how despite some striking similarities that link Augustine’s interpretation of the skin coats to Origen’s view, and even despite the fact that Augustine reiterates an already-established symbolism, his exegesis of the skin tunics still bears a particular relevance and originality.

Affiliations: 1: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of PiteştiStr. Târgu din Vale 1, 110040 PiteştiRomaniaalexandra_parvan@yahoo.it

AbstractThis paper explores Origen’s and Augustine’s interpretations of Gen. 3,21, which regards the coats of skins that God gave to Adam and Eve after they had sinned. I propose the notion of man’s “state of intermediateness” as a basis for examining both authors’ understanding of the skin tunics, and for revealing the similarities and distinctive dissimilarities in their interpretations. I also investigate how Origen’s and Augustine’s different readings of the two accounts of man’s creation, in Gen. 1,27 and Gen. 2,7, can be connected with their understanding of Gen. 3,21. I conclude by showing how despite some striking similarities that link Augustine’s interpretation of the skin coats to Origen’s view, and even despite the fact that Augustine reiterates an already-established symbolism, his exegesis of the skin tunics still bears a particular relevance and originality.

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2012-01-01
2017-11-17

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