Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Spirit-Christology in Irenaeus: A Closer Look

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Spirit-Christology in Irenaeus: A Closer Look

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites

image of Vigiliae Christianae

AbstractOur understanding of Irenaeus’ Spirit-Christology has benefited from several noteworthy studies published over the course of the past century. These investigations, however, failed to reach a consensus on whether Irenaeus’ Spirit-Christology jeopardizes his Trinitarian logic. The purpose of this article is to provide a long-overdue reexamination of Irenaeus’ utilization of Spirit-Christology. I argue Spirit-Christology does have a place in Irenaeus’ theology, but that it poses no threat to his Trinitarian logic. I contend that two passages, previously thought to identify the Holy Spirit with the person of Christ, refer to the reception of the Holy Spirit by the believer for his or her redemption. Moreover, I maintain two other passages do not use Spirit language to refer to the person of Christ, but his divinity.

Affiliations: 1: Marquette University, Department of TheologyMilwaukee, WI 53201USAanthony.briggman@marquette.edu

AbstractOur understanding of Irenaeus’ Spirit-Christology has benefited from several noteworthy studies published over the course of the past century. These investigations, however, failed to reach a consensus on whether Irenaeus’ Spirit-Christology jeopardizes his Trinitarian logic. The purpose of this article is to provide a long-overdue reexamination of Irenaeus’ utilization of Spirit-Christology. I argue Spirit-Christology does have a place in Irenaeus’ theology, but that it poses no threat to his Trinitarian logic. I contend that two passages, previously thought to identify the Holy Spirit with the person of Christ, refer to the reception of the Holy Spirit by the believer for his or her redemption. Moreover, I maintain two other passages do not use Spirit language to refer to the person of Christ, but his divinity.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/15700720/66/1/15700720_066_01_S01_text.html;jsessionid=1qubzpmfgoeuo.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/157007211x571472&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/157007211x571472
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/157007211x571472
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157007211x571472
2012-01-01
2016-09-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation