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Full Access “And Now for Something Completely Different”: A “Pythonic” Reading of Pentecost?

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“And Now for Something Completely Different”: A “Pythonic” Reading of Pentecost?

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Jack Levison’s discussion of spirit filling in Acts, although highly inventive, ultimately lacks cogency. His attempt to view the episode of the slave girl possessed of a “pythonic spirit” as paradigmatic for understanding the experience of the believers at Pentecost fails because of a misreading of the Acts 16 text and a misrepresentation of Luke’s interests with respect to the Hellenistic religious context of early Christianity. Levison’s reading of the Pentecost event is similarly flawed by the importation of unwarranted parallels from the Hellenistic religious environment. Positively, the study points to the need for further research on the subject of ecstasy in the New Testament.

Affiliations: 1: Northwest University Kirkland, Washington, Email: blaine.charette@northwestu.edu

10.1163/157007411X554703
/content/journals/10.1163/157007411x554703
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Jack Levison’s discussion of spirit filling in Acts, although highly inventive, ultimately lacks cogency. His attempt to view the episode of the slave girl possessed of a “pythonic spirit” as paradigmatic for understanding the experience of the believers at Pentecost fails because of a misreading of the Acts 16 text and a misrepresentation of Luke’s interests with respect to the Hellenistic religious context of early Christianity. Levison’s reading of the Pentecost event is similarly flawed by the importation of unwarranted parallels from the Hellenistic religious environment. Positively, the study points to the need for further research on the subject of ecstasy in the New Testament.

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/content/journals/10.1163/157007411x554703
2011-01-01
2016-12-10

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