Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Ecological observations on the Critically Endangered Tobago endemic frog Mannophryne olmonae

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

No previous ecological study has addressed the Critically Endangered (IUCN Red List) Tobago endemic frog Mannophryne olmonae (Aromobatidae) since its initial description in 1983. The species was found in six rivers and 15 first-order streams in northeastern Tobago in 2006. Snout-vent lengths of 126 measured individuals ranged from 9.6-25.7 mm, and the sexes were distinguishable at a length of 18.5 mm. Maximum size was similar in males and females — unlike M. trinitatis from Trinidad, which shows greater sexual size dimorphism. Frogs were found close to streams in forested areas, with a mean distance of 2.0 m from the water's edge, but only calling males were found within the forest itself. Juveniles made up a much larger proportion of the sample than in M. trinitatis. Calling group size averaged 1.9 males, and large choruses were infrequent. Tadpoles were found in isolated pools close to streams, but not in the stream itself; separate size classes suggest multiple deposition by males. There potential listing of M. olmonae as an Environmentally Sensitive Species in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago is discussed.

Affiliations: 1: Project L.E.A.P., c/o Department of Life Sciences, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago; School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, United Kingdom; 2: Project L.E.A.P., c/o Department of Life Sciences, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago; 3: Department of Life Sciences, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago; 4: Department of Biology, 931 College Mall, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH 44691, USA

10.1163/157075407782424584
/content/journals/10.1163/157075407782424584
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157075407782424584
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/157075407782424584
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157075407782424584
2007-10-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Applied Herpetology — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation