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Relative testis size and mating systems in anurans: large testis in multiple-male mating in foam-nesting frogs

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image of Animal Biology
For more content, see Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie (Vol 1-17) and Netherlands Journal of Zoology (Vol 18-52).

Comparative studies of the relative testes size in animals show that promiscuous species have relatively larger testes than monogamous species. Sperm competition favours the evolution of larger ejaculates in many animals – they give bigger testes. In the view, we presented data on relative testis mass for 17 Chinese species including 3 polyandrous species. We analyzed relative testis mass within the Chinese data set and combining those data with published data sets on Japanese and African frogs. We found that polyandrous foam nesting species have relatively large testes, suggesting that sperm competition was an important factor affecting the evolution of relative testes size. For 4 polyandrous species testes mass is positively correlated with intensity (males/mating) but not with risk (frequency of polyandrous matings) of sperm competition.

Affiliations: 1: Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation, Ministry of Education, and Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, College of Life Science, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, China;, Email: Liaobo_0_0@126.com; 2: Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation, Ministry of Education, and Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, College of Life Science, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, China; 3: Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation, Ministry of Education, and Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, College of Life Science, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, China;, Email: Drcqzhou1@163.com

10.1163/157075511X570312
/content/journals/10.1163/157075511x570312
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/content/journals/10.1163/157075511x570312
2011-05-01
2016-12-11

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