Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

A protein homology detection between rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalinae) from South and North America deduced from antigenically related metalloproteases

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

For more content, see Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie (Vol 1-17) and Netherlands Journal of Zoology (Vol 18-52).

Despite the fact that the analysis of two venom proteins is a limited investigation, the occurrence of proteins antigenically related between two Crotalus species from very distant geographic locations may be of importance to a further understanding of venom immunology. In this study, shared venom antigens of crotaline snakes are determined by immunoprecipitin analysis using rocket line immunoelectrophoresis (RLIE). Metalloprotease components were detected in the venom of Uracoan Rattlesnake (Crotalus vegrandis) from Venezuela, and in the venom of the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) from Texas, USA. Cross-reactive components detected in both species were identified using rocket line immunoelectrophoresis (RLIE). The present study was focused on a comparison of Crotalus antigens by anode deflection. There was cross-reactivity between Uracoina-1 from C. vegrandis and C. atrox venom tested with polyvalent Bothrops/Crotalus antivenom. Moreover, a common sequence of amino acids has been found between Uracoina-1 (C. vegrandis) and a catrocollastatin precursor from C. atrox. These results confirm the existence of cross-reacting components between antigenic extracts of both snake venoms. Rattlesnakes originally spread from North to South America, and both studied species, which share a similar protein, have probably been separated since the Cretaceous, for more than 80 million years.

Affiliations: 1: Immunochemistry Section, Tropical Medicine Institute, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 47423, Caracas 1041, Venezuela; 2: Natural Toxins Research Center, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, Texas, USA; 3: Immunochemistry Section, Tropical Medicine Institute, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 47423, Caracas 1041, Venezuela; Natural Toxins Research Center, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, Texas, USA

10.1163/157075607782232161
/content/journals/10.1163/157075607782232161
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157075607782232161
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/157075607782232161
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157075607782232161
2007-10-01
2016-12-07

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Animal Biology — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation