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Spontaneous neoplasms in zoo mammals, birds, and reptiles in Taiwan – a 10-year survey

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image of Animal Biology
For more content, see Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie (Vol 1-17) and Netherlands Journal of Zoology (Vol 18-52).

The characteristics of 163 spontaneous neoplasms diagnosed in 150 necropsied zoo mammals, birds, and reptiles at Taipei Zoo during 1994-2003 were analyzed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were employed to classify the tumor types. A total of 2657 necropsied zoo animals, including 1335 mammals, 873 birds and 449 reptiles led to the diagnosis of tumor in 8.1% (108/1335), 4.2% (37/873) and 1.1% (5/449) of cases, respectively. The most predominant type of tumors in mammals was mammary gland tumors (12.0%, 13/108), followed by uterine smooth muscle tumors (10.2%, 11/108), lymphosarcoma (9.3%, 10/108), hepatocellular carcinoma (8.3%, 9/108), and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (6.5%, 7/108). The avian neoplasm with the highest incidence was lymphosarcoma (35.1%, 13/37). Five individual neoplasms were found in different reptile species. The overall incidence of malignant tumors (63.8%, 104/163) was greater than that of benign tumors (36.2%, 59/163). Immunohistochemistry characterization of these tumors revealed a histogenesis which is similar to that seen in domestic animals and humans.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Pathology, St. Martin De Porres Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan, Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan; 2: Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan; 3: Taipei Zoo, Taipei, Taiwan; 4: Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan;, Email: chhsuliu@ntu.edu.tw

10.1163/157075611X616941
/content/journals/10.1163/157075611x616941
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/content/journals/10.1163/157075611x616941
2012-01-01
2016-12-11

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