Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Precautionary Management and the Development of Future Fishing Opportunities: The International Regulation of New and Exploratory Fisheries

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Precautionary Management and the Development of Future Fishing Opportunities: The International Regulation of New and Exploratory Fisheries

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

The extensive pressures upon current commercial fisheries, compounded by the projected impacts of climate change and associated processes on marine ecosystems, will increasingly displace elements of future fishing effort towards new locations, target species and techniques. For transboundary stocks, where a new or exploratory fishery is contemplated, Article 6(6) of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement 1995 mandates cautious conservation measures to acquire sufficient catch data to assess the impacts of fishing on the stock and surrounding ecosystem. Thereafter, if appropriate, measures may be adopted to facilitate the gradual development of the fishery and its eventual transition to commercial management. However, there has been minimal analysis of the regulatory requirements for emergent fisheries during this interim stage. This article accordingly collates and evaluates the current international law and practice towards new and exploratory fisheries, with particular reference to Antarctic developments and the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems from proliferating deep-sea fisheries.

Affiliations: 1: Senior Research Associate and Nippon Foundation Senior Nereus Fellow, Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea, Utrecht UniversityThe NetherlandsLecturer in Law, Cardiff UniversityUnited Kingdom j.r.caddell@uu.nl

The extensive pressures upon current commercial fisheries, compounded by the projected impacts of climate change and associated processes on marine ecosystems, will increasingly displace elements of future fishing effort towards new locations, target species and techniques. For transboundary stocks, where a new or exploratory fishery is contemplated, Article 6(6) of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement 1995 mandates cautious conservation measures to acquire sufficient catch data to assess the impacts of fishing on the stock and surrounding ecosystem. Thereafter, if appropriate, measures may be adopted to facilitate the gradual development of the fishery and its eventual transition to commercial management. However, there has been minimal analysis of the regulatory requirements for emergent fisheries during this interim stage. This article accordingly collates and evaluates the current international law and practice towards new and exploratory fisheries, with particular reference to Antarctic developments and the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems from proliferating deep-sea fisheries.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/15718085/33/1/15718085_033_01_s007_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/15718085-13310013&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/15718085-13310013
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15718085-13310013
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15718085-13310013
2018-03-12
2018-09-23

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation