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Morris v. The United Kingdom

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The changes introduced by the United Kingdom's Armed Forces Act 1996 had gone a long way towards meeting the Court's concerns about the structure of the UK court martial system. However, the position and powers of the two serving officers and of the Defence Council in its capacity as “reviewing authority” meant that the applicant's misgivings about the independence of the court martial and its status as a “tribunal” were objectively justified.

10.1163/157181302760446348
/content/journals/10.1163/157181302760446348
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/content/journals/10.1163/157181302760446348
2002-01-01
2016-09-27

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