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Compliance with Philosophy of Exemption from Notification at Termination of Contract: Study in Light of Jordanian Labour Law

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[Abstract Under the Jordanian Labour Code 1996, it is not permissible for an employer to terminate a contract without giving the employee at least 1-month notice before the date of termination, because sudden dismissal would catch the worker unaware. However, there are cases in which an employer is exempted from giving prior notice, due to either the nature of the contract (e.g., definite-period contracts or employment under probation) or the nature of termination (e.g., due to the employee’s conduct resulting in a major error or due to technical or economic justifications such as redundancy). This study is devoted to examining all such cases in order to bring to light to what extent such cases truly reflect the philosophy behind exemption from notice., Abstract Under the Jordanian Labour Code 1996, it is not permissible for an employer to terminate a contract without giving the employee at least 1-month notice before the date of termination, because sudden dismissal would catch the worker unaware. However, there are cases in which an employer is exempted from giving prior notice, due to either the nature of the contract (e.g., definite-period contracts or employment under probation) or the nature of termination (e.g., due to the employee’s conduct resulting in a major error or due to technical or economic justifications such as redundancy). This study is devoted to examining all such cases in order to bring to light to what extent such cases truly reflect the philosophy behind exemption from notice.]

Affiliations: 1: Faculty of Law, Yarmouk University Jordan

10.1163/157302512X612140
/content/journals/10.1163/157302512x612140
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/content/journals/10.1163/157302512x612140
2012-01-01
2017-04-28

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