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Egalitarianism Reconsidered

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[This paper argues that egalitarian theories should be judged by the degree to which they meet four different challenges. Fundamentalist egalitarianism, which contends that certain inequalities are intrinsically bad or unjust regardless of their consequences, fails to meet these challenges. Building on discussions by T.M. Scanlon and David Miller, we argue that egalitarianism is better understood in terms of commitments to six egalitarian objectives. A consequence of our view, in contrast to Martin O’Neill’s “non-intrinsic egalitarianism,” is that egalitarianism is better understood as a family of views than as a single ethical position., This paper argues that egalitarian theories should be judged by the degree to which they meet four different challenges. Fundamentalist egalitarianism, which contends that certain inequalities are intrinsically bad or unjust regardless of their consequences, fails to meet these challenges. Building on discussions by T.M. Scanlon and David Miller, we argue that egalitarianism is better understood in terms of commitments to six egalitarian objectives. A consequence of our view, in contrast to Martin O'Neill's “non-intrinsic egalitarianism,” is that egalitarianism is better understood as a family of views than as a single ethical position.]

Affiliations: 1: Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin-Madison 5185 Helen C. White Hall, 600 North Park Street, Madison WI 53706, USA, dhausman@wisc.edu, mlwaldren@wisc.edu

10.1163/174552411X601067
/content/journals/10.1163/174552411x601067
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/content/journals/10.1163/174552411x601067
2011-01-01
2016-12-05

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