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Open Access Maximus Confessor’s Interpretation of Abraham’s Hospitality in Genesis 18 and the Preceding Orthodox Tradition


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Maximus Confessor’s Interpretation of Abraham’s Hospitality in Genesis 18 and the Preceding Orthodox Tradition


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In Orthodox exegesis, there are two main interpretations of God’s theophany to Abraham in Gen 18: the three ‘men’ were either the pre-incarnate Christ and two angels, or, later, they were a type of the Trinity. This article deals with Maximus the Confessor’s exegesis of this passage. His interpretations are treated in the context of his teaching on love, his philosophical ideas and his mystical teaching. It shows that Maximus’ exegesis can be understood as a creative synthesis of the preceding Orthodox tradition’s two interpretations.


Affiliations: 1: Russian Christian Academy for the Humanities, St. Petersburg, Russia
 grbenevitch@gmail.com


10.1163/18177565-00131p06
/content/journals/10.1163/18177565-00131p06
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In Orthodox exegesis, there are two main interpretations of God’s theophany to Abraham in Gen 18: the three ‘men’ were either the pre-incarnate Christ and two angels, or, later, they were a type of the Trinity. This article deals with Maximus the Confessor’s exegesis of this passage. His interpretations are treated in the context of his teaching on love, his philosophical ideas and his mystical teaching. It shows that Maximus’ exegesis can be understood as a creative synthesis of the preceding Orthodox tradition’s two interpretations.


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/content/journals/10.1163/18177565-00131p06
2017-11-28
2018-06-20

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