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Open Access Little Known Aspects of Veneration of the Old Testament Sabbath in Medieval Ethiopia


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Little Known Aspects of Veneration of the Old Testament Sabbath in Medieval Ethiopia


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The Church of Ethiopia did observe both the Old Testament or the Jewish Sabbath and its Christian counterpart. This practice became one of the distinctive features of the Ethiopian Christianity. In various periods of its history the problem of veneration of the Jewish Sabbath provoked a lasting controversy among the country’s clergy. It was under the reign of the King Zär’a Ya‘ǝqob (1434-1468) that the observance of both Sabbaths became the officially accepted by the Ethiopian Church and the State. However, some evidences of this custom can be traced for many centuries before. Following the Confession of faith of the King Claudius (1540-1559), the priority was given to the celebration of Sunday. The author of the article was fortunate to discover several cases of the preferential veneration of Sunday during a military campaign of 1781, described in the chronicle of the King Täklä Giyorgis I.


Affiliations: 1: Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Manuscript Department of the National Library of Russia; National Research University Higher School of Economics (St. Petersburg)
 ekater-ina@mail.ru


10.1163/18177565-00131p13
/content/journals/10.1163/18177565-00131p13
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
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The Church of Ethiopia did observe both the Old Testament or the Jewish Sabbath and its Christian counterpart. This practice became one of the distinctive features of the Ethiopian Christianity. In various periods of its history the problem of veneration of the Jewish Sabbath provoked a lasting controversy among the country’s clergy. It was under the reign of the King Zär’a Ya‘ǝqob (1434-1468) that the observance of both Sabbaths became the officially accepted by the Ethiopian Church and the State. However, some evidences of this custom can be traced for many centuries before. Following the Confession of faith of the King Claudius (1540-1559), the priority was given to the celebration of Sunday. The author of the article was fortunate to discover several cases of the preferential veneration of Sunday during a military campaign of 1781, described in the chronicle of the King Täklä Giyorgis I.


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/content/journals/10.1163/18177565-00131p13
2017-11-28
2018-06-24

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