Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Parental Child Abduction and the State: Identity, Diplomacy and the Duty of Care

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Parental Child Abduction and the State: Identity, Diplomacy and the Duty of Care

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

States alternate between the roles of ‘caretaker’ and ‘rescuer’ when providing care to citizens abroad. This article suggests that they are more likely to assume the ‘rescuer’ role when core values underpinning their self-identity are at stake. This dynamic is explored by examining a case where a Norwegian mother re-abducted her two children from Morocco. In the process, Norway’s foreign minister authorized shielding the children at the Norwegian Embassy in Rabat, citing ‘Norway’s duty to protect two Norwegian minors in fear of their lives’. A diplomatic conflict between Norway and Morocco followed. The Norwegian response must be seen in light of Norway’s self-identity as a frontrunner for children’s rights. Ultimately, helping the children ‘had’ to trump concerns about diplomatic costs. The broader dilemmas that this case exemplifies should be relevant also to other cases where a state’s concern for a child citizen is pitted against its obligation to diplomatic conventions.

Affiliations: 1: Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) N-0033 OsloNorway kmh@nupi.no

10.1163/1871191X-11302010
/content/journals/10.1163/1871191x-11302010
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

States alternate between the roles of ‘caretaker’ and ‘rescuer’ when providing care to citizens abroad. This article suggests that they are more likely to assume the ‘rescuer’ role when core values underpinning their self-identity are at stake. This dynamic is explored by examining a case where a Norwegian mother re-abducted her two children from Morocco. In the process, Norway’s foreign minister authorized shielding the children at the Norwegian Embassy in Rabat, citing ‘Norway’s duty to protect two Norwegian minors in fear of their lives’. A diplomatic conflict between Norway and Morocco followed. The Norwegian response must be seen in light of Norway’s self-identity as a frontrunner for children’s rights. Ultimately, helping the children ‘had’ to trump concerns about diplomatic costs. The broader dilemmas that this case exemplifies should be relevant also to other cases where a state’s concern for a child citizen is pitted against its obligation to diplomatic conventions.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/1871191x/13/2/1871191X_013_02_s003_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/1871191x-11302010&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/1871191x-11302010
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1871191x-11302010
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1871191x-11302010
2018-03-05
2018-04-22

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation