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Full Access Undoing the Future: The Theology of the Book of Zechariah*

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Undoing the Future: The Theology of the Book of Zechariah*

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image of Horizons in Biblical Theology

Abstract Reading the book of Zechariah as a whole for its theology requires giving special attention to the way that the historical narratives in 1:1-6, 7-8, and 11:4-17 shape the discourse. The opening narrative, 1:1-6, delineates the movement of the book as YHWH returns to Zion and so calls for the returning exiles to return to their god. Chapters seven and eight clarify what it means for the people to return to YHWH, in line with the earlier prophets’ call to pursue justice. 11:4-17 narrates the failure of especially the leaders to enact justice and the consequences of this failure. Nevertheless, the book affirms the promise of YHWH to do good to Zion, even if modified and cast into the eschatological future.

Affiliations: 1: University Park United Methodist Church rlfoster01@att.net

10.1163/187122012X602530
/content/journals/10.1163/187122012x602530
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
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Abstract Reading the book of Zechariah as a whole for its theology requires giving special attention to the way that the historical narratives in 1:1-6, 7-8, and 11:4-17 shape the discourse. The opening narrative, 1:1-6, delineates the movement of the book as YHWH returns to Zion and so calls for the returning exiles to return to their god. Chapters seven and eight clarify what it means for the people to return to YHWH, in line with the earlier prophets’ call to pursue justice. 11:4-17 narrates the failure of especially the leaders to enact justice and the consequences of this failure. Nevertheless, the book affirms the promise of YHWH to do good to Zion, even if modified and cast into the eschatological future.

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2012-01-01
2016-12-02

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