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Open Access Place, Space, and Authority. The Mission and Reversed Mission of the Ghanaian Seventh-day Adventist Church in Amsterdam

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Place, Space, and Authority. The Mission and Reversed Mission of the Ghanaian Seventh-day Adventist Church in Amsterdam

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African churches in diaspora frequently use mission discourses in which they seek to reach out not only to Africans but to 'native' populations as well. However, though such discourses are sometimes followed up by praxis and incidental 'success,' there often appears a gap between socalled 'reversed mission' discourse and its accompanying praxis. This article explores why this gap may exist, through a space and place related understanding of mission and a case study of the Ghanaian Seventh-day Adventists in Amsterdam. It is argued that ethnicised forms of place making, reversed mission as an identity discourse, and asymmetrical and ambivalent authority relations may account for the breach between reversed mission discourse and praxis among Ghanaian Adventists in Amsterdam and possibly the larger African Christian diaspora. Les églises africaines en diaspora se servent fréquemment des discours de mission dans lesquels ils cherchent à atteindre non seulement les Africains, mais aussi les populations locales. Cependant, même si ces discours sont parfois traduits en pratique et jouissent d'un certain 'succès,' on constate souvent un écart entre le discours de la « mission inversée », et la pratique qui l'accompagne. Cet article essaie d'analyser ces écarts entre discours et pratique à travers une compréhension de la mission dans sa dimension globale et locale et une étude de cas sur les Adventistes du septième jour ghanéens à Amsterdam. Il est soutenu que les formes ethniques de création d'espaces, la mission inversée en tant que discours d'identité et les relations d'autorité asymétriques et ambivalentes peuvent expliquer la brèche entre le discours de la mission inversée et la pratique parmi les Adventistes ghanéens à Amsterdam et probablement la plus grande diaspora Africaine chrétienne.

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/content/journals/10.1163/187254509x12477244375175
2009-09-01
2016-07-27

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