Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access “I was crying, I did not come back with anything”: Women’s Experiences of Deportation from Europe to Nigeria

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

“I was crying, I did not come back with anything”: Women’s Experiences of Deportation from Europe to Nigeria

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of African Diaspora

Abstract The aim of this article is to study the impact of deportation on women’s lives, via the narrated experiences of Nigerian women deported from the European Union. It focuses on women’s stories about the period prior to their travel to Europe and their motivations for doing so; on stories about the journey and their experiences as migrants; and finally on stories about their deportation and their life after returning home to Nigeria. By taking this three-step approach and by focusing on deportees’ experiences, the authors want to contribute to an emic understanding of deportation in which gender and kinship play a crucial part. The obligation to migrate is a social as well as an economic duty for women in the Nigerian context. Whereas anthropological studies have so far focused on deportees’ feelings of non-belonging, this article shows that women’s experiences of deportation are highly connected to family belonging.

Abstract The aim of this article is to study the impact of deportation on women’s lives, via the narrated experiences of Nigerian women deported from the European Union. It focuses on women’s stories about the period prior to their travel to Europe and their motivations for doing so; on stories about the journey and their experiences as migrants; and finally on stories about their deportation and their life after returning home to Nigeria. By taking this three-step approach and by focusing on deportees’ experiences, the authors want to contribute to an emic understanding of deportation in which gender and kinship play a crucial part. The obligation to migrate is a social as well as an economic duty for women in the Nigerian context. Whereas anthropological studies have so far focused on deportees’ feelings of non-belonging, this article shows that women’s experiences of deportation are highly connected to family belonging.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18725465/5/2/18725465_005_02_S02_text.html;jsessionid=5RZg4M3OrPXDY813EqxNr0IM.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/18725457-12341235&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/18725457-12341235
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/18725457-12341235
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/18725457-12341235
2012-01-01
2016-12-04

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation