Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Many Gateways to the Gateway City: Elites, Class and Policy Networking in the London African Diaspora

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Many Gateways to the Gateway City: Elites, Class and Policy Networking in the London African Diaspora

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

Can we speak of the existence of an ‘African diaspora’ over and above the many discrete national diaspora groups in Britain? The present paper explores the conviviality and reach of black African elite networks in London across ethnic boundaries, their mastery of a shared language of governance and their capacity as actors and activists operating in civil society. Their achievement has been, the paper argues, to create a nascent black African diasporic public sphere in which the diaspora is imagined, constructed and mobilised across divisions of language, religion, nation and class. New multicultural policies in Britain have facilitated this networking, which is grounded in ethical notions of caring, justice and ethnic permeability.

Affiliations: 1: Keele University, School of Sociology and Criminology Keele, Staffs. ST5 5BG UK, Email: P.Werbner@keele.ac.uk

Can we speak of the existence of an ‘African diaspora’ over and above the many discrete national diaspora groups in Britain? The present paper explores the conviviality and reach of black African elite networks in London across ethnic boundaries, their mastery of a shared language of governance and their capacity as actors and activists operating in civil society. Their achievement has been, the paper argues, to create a nascent black African diasporic public sphere in which the diaspora is imagined, constructed and mobilised across divisions of language, religion, nation and class. New multicultural policies in Britain have facilitated this networking, which is grounded in ethical notions of caring, justice and ethnic permeability.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18725457/v3n1_s8.html;jsessionid=ic6XZQSPZ8ON7mA71i7YBHtp.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187254610x505691&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187254610x505691
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187254610x505691
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187254610x505691
2010-01-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation