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Trust but Verify: Building Cultures of Support for the Responsibility to Protect Norm

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[Whether we wish to acknowledge it or not, trust issues permeate all security policy deliberations, including recent discussions at United Nations headquarters focused on building acceptance of the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) norm and laying out plans for the full implementation of all three of its programmatic 'pillars.' This paper assesses resources for and commitments to trust building in three core areas – trust in the viability of the norm itself, trust in the persons most closely associated with the norm, and trust in the institutions (UN and Regional Bodies) projected to 'house' the norm and oversee all phases of its implementation. As this implementation process moves from consideration of state-focused, 'first pillar' preventive and early warning capacities to 'third pillar,' last-resort, direct responses to threats of atrocity crimes, the need for durable and dependable bonds of trust between RtoP advocates, diplomats and policymakers becomes more acute., Whether we wish to acknowledge it or not, trust issues permeate all security policy deliberations, including recent discussions at United Nations headquarters focused on building acceptance of the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) norm and laying out plans for the full implementation of all three of its programmatic 'pillars.' This paper assesses resources for and commitments to trust building in three core areas – trust in the viability of the norm itself, trust in the persons most closely associated with the norm, and trust in the institutions (UN and Regional Bodies) projected to 'house' the norm and oversee all phases of its implementation. As this implementation process moves from consideration of state-focused, 'first pillar' preventive and early warning capacities to 'third pillar,' last-resort, direct responses to threats of atrocity crimes, the need for durable and dependable bonds of trust between RtoP advocates, diplomats and policymakers becomes more acute.]

10.1163/187598411X586043
/content/journals/10.1163/187598411x586043
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/content/journals/10.1163/187598411x586043
2011-09-01
2016-12-05

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