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A marine water strider (Hemiptera: Veliidae) from Dominican amber

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image of Insect Systematics & Evolution

A fossil water strider, Halovelia electrodominica sp. n., is described from the Oligo-Miocene Dominican amber based upon a couple seemingly trapped while they were mating. This is the first fossil record of the genus Halovelia (Haloveliinae, Veliidae) and, since most living haloveliine water striders are marine, probably also the first record of a marine insect from amber. Extant haloveliines are confined to the Indo-West Pacific region and the Dominican amber species therefore represent another example of remarkable geographical extinction in the Caribbean during the late Tertiary.

Affiliations: 1: Zoological Museum, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark., Email: nmandersen@zmuc.ku.dk; 2: Department of Entomology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore- gon 97331-2907, U.S.A.

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/content/journals/10.1163/187631298x00131
1998-01-01
2016-12-07

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