Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Transition, Co-Optation and Permeation—Evolution of the Party’s Organizing Techniques in a Challenging Environment 1

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Transition, Co-Optation and Permeation—Evolution of the Party’s Organizing Techniques in a Challenging Environment 1

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of The China Nonprofit Review

Abstract In the last 30 years, China’s ruling party, with its Reform and Opening, has made achievements that have astonished the world. In that same time span, the Party has overcome a variety of foreseeable and non-foreseeable challenges. Meeting these challenges, even turning them into momentum for reform and resources for institutional innovation, is a matter of great importance for the existence and evolution of the current system. This article considers three challenges facing the Party from the angle of organization-building: the challenge of democratic elections, revolving around village self-government; the challenge of social fragmentation resulting from the market economy; and the challenge, intimately linked to the first two, of a growing civil society. Amidst our missteps, as we “cross the river by feeling the stones”, the ruling Party has adopted various policy responses to these challenges. This article focuses on three organizing techniques: transition, co-optation, and permeation. After briefly introducing these three techniques, the article then attempts a holistic analysis and explores a few related theoretical issues.

10.1163/18765149-12341236
/content/journals/10.1163/18765149-12341236
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

Abstract In the last 30 years, China’s ruling party, with its Reform and Opening, has made achievements that have astonished the world. In that same time span, the Party has overcome a variety of foreseeable and non-foreseeable challenges. Meeting these challenges, even turning them into momentum for reform and resources for institutional innovation, is a matter of great importance for the existence and evolution of the current system. This article considers three challenges facing the Party from the angle of organization-building: the challenge of democratic elections, revolving around village self-government; the challenge of social fragmentation resulting from the market economy; and the challenge, intimately linked to the first two, of a growing civil society. Amidst our missteps, as we “cross the river by feeling the stones”, the ruling Party has adopted various policy responses to these challenges. This article focuses on three organizing techniques: transition, co-optation, and permeation. After briefly introducing these three techniques, the article then attempts a holistic analysis and explores a few related theoretical issues.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18765149/4/1/18765149_004_01_S03_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/18765149-12341236&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/18765149-12341236
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/18765149-12341236
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/18765149-12341236
2012-01-01
2017-08-19

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation