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Full Access Early Dutch Explorations in North America

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Early Dutch Explorations in North America

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The Tawagonshi document suggests that an official treaty was conducted between the Dutch and Native Americans in 1613. Yet a close look at the background of Dutch-Native interaction in the Hudson and Delaware Valleys during the 1610s throws doubt on the historical veracity of the document. Prior to 1621, Dutch traders did not have any need for an official treaty with local Indian groups on behalf of the authorities in the Dutch Republic, nor were they authorized to engage in such treaty-making. Thus any agreement cannot be construed to be a treaty between sovereign nations. Yet there is reason to believe that Dutch traders and local native people entered into some form of negotiation. The Dutch building of Fort Nassau on native lands and the military collaboration of which the Kleyntjen affair is evidence suggest as much.

Affiliations: 1: University of St Andrews, E-mail: jj37@st-andrews.ac.uk

10.1163/18770703-00301004
/content/journals/10.1163/18770703-00301004
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The Tawagonshi document suggests that an official treaty was conducted between the Dutch and Native Americans in 1613. Yet a close look at the background of Dutch-Native interaction in the Hudson and Delaware Valleys during the 1610s throws doubt on the historical veracity of the document. Prior to 1621, Dutch traders did not have any need for an official treaty with local Indian groups on behalf of the authorities in the Dutch Republic, nor were they authorized to engage in such treaty-making. Thus any agreement cannot be construed to be a treaty between sovereign nations. Yet there is reason to believe that Dutch traders and local native people entered into some form of negotiation. The Dutch building of Fort Nassau on native lands and the military collaboration of which the Kleyntjen affair is evidence suggest as much.

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/content/journals/10.1163/18770703-00301004
2013-01-01
2016-12-09

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