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Full Access The Role of Civil Society in Creating the International Criminal Court Statute: Ten Years On and Looking Back

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The Role of Civil Society in Creating the International Criminal Court Statute: Ten Years On and Looking Back

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This article demonstrates that civil society, in particular the Coalition for the International Criminal Court (Coalition), played a significant role in the creation of the Statute for the ICC. At the ten year anniversary of the ICC entry into force, a reflection on the impact of civil society in this particular treaty negotiation is useful and aims to tell an important element of the ICC story often not exposed. The Coalition was developed to act as an umbrella for a range of organisations wishing to see a just and effective ICC and was actively involved in the negotiations in New York and Rome. From writing papers, directly lobbying delegates, hosting meetings and events, creating daily updates and linking the UN discussions back to capitals, members of the Coalition worked hard on ensuring a voice wider than State representatives was heard in the debate. The Coalition members also provided a crucial connection with the media and added creativity, emotion and colour to the diplomatic negotiations. Noting the philosophical differences between various groups within civil society on the ICC and the careful processes and procedures used by the Coalition, this article highlights the tension between diversity and efficiency within the non-government organisation community.

Affiliations: 1: Melbourne Law School and Australian Red Cross, hdurham@redcross.org.au

10.1163/18781527-00301001
/content/journals/10.1163/18781527-00301001
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This article demonstrates that civil society, in particular the Coalition for the International Criminal Court (Coalition), played a significant role in the creation of the Statute for the ICC. At the ten year anniversary of the ICC entry into force, a reflection on the impact of civil society in this particular treaty negotiation is useful and aims to tell an important element of the ICC story often not exposed. The Coalition was developed to act as an umbrella for a range of organisations wishing to see a just and effective ICC and was actively involved in the negotiations in New York and Rome. From writing papers, directly lobbying delegates, hosting meetings and events, creating daily updates and linking the UN discussions back to capitals, members of the Coalition worked hard on ensuring a voice wider than State representatives was heard in the debate. The Coalition members also provided a crucial connection with the media and added creativity, emotion and colour to the diplomatic negotiations. Noting the philosophical differences between various groups within civil society on the ICC and the careful processes and procedures used by the Coalition, this article highlights the tension between diversity and efficiency within the non-government organisation community.

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/content/journals/10.1163/18781527-00301001
2012-01-01
2016-12-04

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