Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Multisensory Effects Differ for Counting Small and Large Pulse Numbers

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

In Illusory Flash (IF) experiments, congruent multisensory presentation has no effect on the mean estimate of the number of events, but decreases the variance in comparison with unisensory presentation. In contrast, congruent multisensory presentation in other Temporal Numerosity Judgement (TNJ) tasks affects the mean estimate (i.e., it often results in a reduction in underestimation) and increases the variance. In three experiments, we investigated the differences between both paradigms as possible causes of this discrepancy: the presence or absence of incongruent stimuli (Experiment 1), the instruction to the observer to either count flashes, beeps or multisensory events (Experiment 2), and the range of pulses presented (Experiment 3). We found significant differences between the mean numerosity estimate of multisensory and unisensory series in Experiment 3, but not in 1 and 2. This suggests that the difference in the range of pulses presented in IF (1–3 pulses) and TNJ (1–10 pulses) is the primary cause of the discrepancy. In the discussion we propose that this result may be explained by the use of two different strategies and their susceptibility to multisensory presentation. For small pulse numbers, observers can accurately count both unisensory and multisensory pulses. For larger numbers, observers can no longer count but will estimate the number based on the pulse series duration which is improved for multisensory stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands; TNO, Department of Perceptual and Cognitive Systems, P.O. Box 23, 3769 ZG Soesterberg, The Netherlands; 2: TNO, Department of Perceptual and Cognitive Systems, P.O. Box 23, 3769 ZG Soesterberg, The Netherlands; 3: Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847611x595882
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847611x595882
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847611x595882
2011-11-01
2016-09-27

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation