Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Time and time again: Temporal influences of repeated stimuli

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Time and time again: Temporal influences of repeated stimuli

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Temporal perception does not always correspond to objective time. Several factors contribute to distort perceived timing of stimuli. This work investigates the effect of repeated stimulus presentation (either a sound or a light) on perceived timing of a subsequent audiovisual pair. At the beginning of each trial, a series of sounds or lights is presented with a constant interval. One final stimulus is presented either rhythmically or with a temporal shift. In a psychophysical task, participants judged whether the last stimulus in the sequence is presented before or after a temporal probe in the other modality. Results indicate two types of effects. First, the last stimulus of the sequence appears to be delayed with respect to the probe in the other modality. Second, deviations from regular rhythm tend to be perceptually compensated. Overall, perceived stimulus timing is shown to be affected by the temporal context, and the effect is consistent with a change in perceptual latency. The change depends on the modality of the repeated stimulus and can be explained as a combined effect of an temporal adaptation (i.e., slowing down perception) plus a temporal expectation acting on the slightly arrhythmic stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: University of Birmingham, GB

Temporal perception does not always correspond to objective time. Several factors contribute to distort perceived timing of stimuli. This work investigates the effect of repeated stimulus presentation (either a sound or a light) on perceived timing of a subsequent audiovisual pair. At the beginning of each trial, a series of sounds or lights is presented with a constant interval. One final stimulus is presented either rhythmically or with a temporal shift. In a psychophysical task, participants judged whether the last stimulus in the sequence is presented before or after a temporal probe in the other modality. Results indicate two types of effects. First, the last stimulus of the sequence appears to be delayed with respect to the probe in the other modality. Second, deviations from regular rhythm tend to be perceptually compensated. Overall, perceived stimulus timing is shown to be affected by the temporal context, and the effect is consistent with a change in perceptual latency. The change depends on the modality of the repeated stimulus and can be explained as a combined effect of an temporal adaptation (i.e., slowing down perception) plus a temporal expectation acting on the slightly arrhythmic stimuli.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S009_text.html;jsessionid=_TfsBmmqrOCG6zxF2F7sGxTC.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646334&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646334
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646334
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646334
2012-01-01
2016-12-03

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation