Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Predictable variations in auditory pitch modulate the spatial processing of visual stimuli: An ERP study

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Predictable variations in auditory pitch modulate the spatial processing of visual stimuli: An ERP study

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

We investigated whether perceiving predictable ‘ups and downs’ in acoustic pitch (as can be heard in musical melodies) can influence the spatial processing of visual stimuli as a consequence of a ‘spatial recoding’ of sound (see Foster and Zatorre, 2010; Rusconi et al., 2006). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed a color discrimination task of a visual target that could appear either above or below a centrally-presented fixation point. Each experimental trial started with an auditory isochronous stream of 11 tones including a high- and a low-pitched tone. The visual target appeared isochronously after the last tone. In the ‘non-predictive’ condition, the tones were presented in an erratic fashion (e.g., ‘high-low-low-high-high-low-high …’). In the ‘predictive condition’, the melodic combination of high- and low-pitched tones was highly predictable (e.g., ‘low-high-low-high-low …’). Within the predictive condition, the visual stimuli appeared congruently or incongruently with respect to the melody (‘… low-high-low-high-low-UP’ or ‘… low-high-low-high-low-DOWN’, respectively). Participants showed faster responses when the visual target appeared after a predictive melody. Electrophysiologically, early (25–150 ms) amplitude effects of predictability were observed in frontal and parietal regions, spreading to central regions (N1) afterwards. Predictability effects were also found in the P2–N2 complex and the P3 in central and parietal regions. Significant auditory-to-visual congruency effects were also observed in the parieto-occipital P3 component. Our findings reveal the existence of crossmodal effects of perceiving auditory isochronous melodies on visual temporal orienting. More importantly, our results suggest that pitch information can be transformed into a spatial code that shapes the spatial processing in other modalities such as vision.

Affiliations: 1: Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, ES

We investigated whether perceiving predictable ‘ups and downs’ in acoustic pitch (as can be heard in musical melodies) can influence the spatial processing of visual stimuli as a consequence of a ‘spatial recoding’ of sound (see Foster and Zatorre, 2010; Rusconi et al., 2006). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed a color discrimination task of a visual target that could appear either above or below a centrally-presented fixation point. Each experimental trial started with an auditory isochronous stream of 11 tones including a high- and a low-pitched tone. The visual target appeared isochronously after the last tone. In the ‘non-predictive’ condition, the tones were presented in an erratic fashion (e.g., ‘high-low-low-high-high-low-high …’). In the ‘predictive condition’, the melodic combination of high- and low-pitched tones was highly predictable (e.g., ‘low-high-low-high-low …’). Within the predictive condition, the visual stimuli appeared congruently or incongruently with respect to the melody (‘… low-high-low-high-low-UP’ or ‘… low-high-low-high-low-DOWN’, respectively). Participants showed faster responses when the visual target appeared after a predictive melody. Electrophysiologically, early (25–150 ms) amplitude effects of predictability were observed in frontal and parietal regions, spreading to central regions (N1) afterwards. Predictability effects were also found in the P2–N2 complex and the P3 in central and parietal regions. Significant auditory-to-visual congruency effects were also observed in the parieto-occipital P3 component. Our findings reveal the existence of crossmodal effects of perceiving auditory isochronous melodies on visual temporal orienting. More importantly, our results suggest that pitch information can be transformed into a spatial code that shapes the spatial processing in other modalities such as vision.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S023_text.html;jsessionid=2LcP-oydpAZ9OBFyITqsOFTe.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646488&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646488
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Foster N. E. , Zatorre R. J. ( 2010). "Cortical structure predicts success in performing musical transformation judgments", NeuroImage Vol 53, 2636. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.06.042
2. Rusconi E. , Umiltà C. , Galfano G. ( 2006). "Breaking ranks: space and number may march to the beat of a different drum", Cortex Vol 42, 11241127. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0010-9452(08)70224-7
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646488
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646488
2012-01-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation