Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Interactions between apparent motion rivalry in vision and touch

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Interactions between apparent motion rivalry in vision and touch

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Introduction: In multistable perception, the brain alternates between several perceptual explanations of ambiguous sensory signals. Recent studies have demonstrated crossmodal interactions between ambiguous and unambiguous signals. However it is currently unknown whether multiple bistable processes can interact across the senses (Conrad et al., 2010; Pressnitzer and Hupe, 2006). Using the apparent motion quartet in vision and touch, this study investigated whether bistable perceptual processes for vision and touch are independent or influence each other when powerful cues of congruency are provided to facilitate visuotactile integration (Conrad et al., in press). Methods: When two visual flashes and/or tactile vibration pulses are presented alternately along the two diagonals of the rectangle, subjects’ percept vacillates between vertical and horizontal apparent motion in the visual and/or tactile modalities (Carter et al., 2008). Observers were presented with unisensory (visual/tactile), visuotactile spatially congruent and incongruent apparent motion quartets and reported their visual or tactile percepts. Results: Congruent stimulation induced pronounced visuotactile interactions as indicated by increased dominance times and %-bias for the percept already dominant under unisensory stimulation. Yet, the temporal dynamics did not converge for congruent stimulation. It depended also on subjects’ attentional focus and was generally slower for tactile than visual reports. Conclusion: Our results support Bayesian approaches to perceptual inference, where the probability of a perceptual interpretation is determined by combining a modality-specific prior with incoming visual and/or tactile evidence. Under congruent stimulation, joint evidence from both senses decelerates the rivalry dynamics by stabilizing the more likely perceptual interpretation. Importantly, the perceptual stabilization was specific to spatiotemporally congruent visuotactile stimulation indicating multisensory rather than cognitive bias mechanisms.

Affiliations: 1: 1Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, DE

Introduction: In multistable perception, the brain alternates between several perceptual explanations of ambiguous sensory signals. Recent studies have demonstrated crossmodal interactions between ambiguous and unambiguous signals. However it is currently unknown whether multiple bistable processes can interact across the senses (Conrad et al., 2010; Pressnitzer and Hupe, 2006). Using the apparent motion quartet in vision and touch, this study investigated whether bistable perceptual processes for vision and touch are independent or influence each other when powerful cues of congruency are provided to facilitate visuotactile integration (Conrad et al., in press). Methods: When two visual flashes and/or tactile vibration pulses are presented alternately along the two diagonals of the rectangle, subjects’ percept vacillates between vertical and horizontal apparent motion in the visual and/or tactile modalities (Carter et al., 2008). Observers were presented with unisensory (visual/tactile), visuotactile spatially congruent and incongruent apparent motion quartets and reported their visual or tactile percepts. Results: Congruent stimulation induced pronounced visuotactile interactions as indicated by increased dominance times and %-bias for the percept already dominant under unisensory stimulation. Yet, the temporal dynamics did not converge for congruent stimulation. It depended also on subjects’ attentional focus and was generally slower for tactile than visual reports. Conclusion: Our results support Bayesian approaches to perceptual inference, where the probability of a perceptual interpretation is determined by combining a modality-specific prior with incoming visual and/or tactile evidence. Under congruent stimulation, joint evidence from both senses decelerates the rivalry dynamics by stabilizing the more likely perceptual interpretation. Importantly, the perceptual stabilization was specific to spatiotemporally congruent visuotactile stimulation indicating multisensory rather than cognitive bias mechanisms.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S024_text.html;jsessionid=mExjbLYwcACYcFwwN7JnPGST.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646497&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646497
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Carter O. , Konkle T. , Wang Q. , Hayward V. , Moore C. I. ( 2008). "Tactile rivalry demonstrated with an ambiguous apparent-motion quartet", Current Biology Vol 18, 10501054. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.06.027
2. Conrad V. , Bartels A. , Kleiner M. , Noppeney U. ( 2010). "Audiovisual interactions in binocular rivalry", Journal of Vision Vol 10( 10) 27, 115. http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/10.10.27
3. Conrad V. , Vitello M. P. , Noppeney U. (in press). "Interactions between apparent motion rivalry in vision and touch", Psychological Science.
4. Pressnitzer D. , Hupe J. M. ( 2006). "Temporal dynamics of auditory and visual bistability reveal common principles of perceptual organization", Current Biology Vol 16, 13511357. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2006.05.054
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646497
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646497
2012-01-01
2016-12-02

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation