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Full Access Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different duration and rise times

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Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different duration and rise times

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The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. Yet, despite similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated (Barnett-Cowan and Harris, 2009, 2011). However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (∼1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with brief (10–50 ms) sound pulses. In the present study the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope. Participants judged the temporal order of the onset of an active head movement and of brief (50 ms) or long (1400 ms) sounds with a square or raised-cosine shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (∼100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (∼115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (duration and temporal envelope). Rather, differences among sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is larger compared to auditory stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, DE

The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. Yet, despite similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated (Barnett-Cowan and Harris, 2009, 2011). However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (∼1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with brief (10–50 ms) sound pulses. In the present study the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope. Participants judged the temporal order of the onset of an active head movement and of brief (50 ms) or long (1400 ms) sounds with a square or raised-cosine shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (∼100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (∼115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (duration and temporal envelope). Rather, differences among sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is larger compared to auditory stimuli.

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1. Barnett-Cowan M. , Harris L. R. ( 2009). "Perceived timing of vestibular stimulation relative to touch, light and sound", Exp. Brain Res. Vol 198, 221231. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-009-1779-4
2. Barnett-Cowan M. , Harris L. R. ( 2011). "Temporal processing of active and passive head movement", Exp. Brain Res. Vol 214, 2735. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-011-2802-0
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646541
2012-01-01
2016-12-07

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