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Full Access Developmental processes in audiovisual object recognition and object location

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Developmental processes in audiovisual object recognition and object location

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

This study investigated whether performance in recognising and locating target objects benefited from the simultaneous presentation of a crossmodal cue. Furthermore, we examined whether these ‘what’ and ‘where’ tasks were affected by developmental processes by testing across different age groups. Using the same set of stimuli, participants conducted either an object recognition task, or object location task. For the recognition task, participants were required to respond to two of four target objects (animals) and withhold response to the remaining two objects. For the location task, participants responded when an object occupied either of two target locations and withheld response if the object occupied a different location. Target stimuli were presented either by vision alone, audition alone, or bimodally. In both tasks cross-modal cues were either congruent or incongruent. The results revealed that response time performance in both the object recognition task and in the object location task benefited from the presence of a congruent cross-modal cue, relative to incongruent or unisensory conditions. In the younger adult group, the effect was strongest for response times although the same pattern was found for accuracy in the object location task but not for the recognition task. Following recent studies on multisensory integration in children (e.g., Brandwein, 2010; Gori, 2008), we then tested performance in children (i.e., 8–14 year olds) using the same task. Although overall performance was affected by age, our findings suggest interesting parallels in the benefit of congruent, cross-modal cues between children and adults, for both object recognition and location tasks.

Affiliations: 1: Trinity College Dublin, IE

This study investigated whether performance in recognising and locating target objects benefited from the simultaneous presentation of a crossmodal cue. Furthermore, we examined whether these ‘what’ and ‘where’ tasks were affected by developmental processes by testing across different age groups. Using the same set of stimuli, participants conducted either an object recognition task, or object location task. For the recognition task, participants were required to respond to two of four target objects (animals) and withhold response to the remaining two objects. For the location task, participants responded when an object occupied either of two target locations and withheld response if the object occupied a different location. Target stimuli were presented either by vision alone, audition alone, or bimodally. In both tasks cross-modal cues were either congruent or incongruent. The results revealed that response time performance in both the object recognition task and in the object location task benefited from the presence of a congruent cross-modal cue, relative to incongruent or unisensory conditions. In the younger adult group, the effect was strongest for response times although the same pattern was found for accuracy in the object location task but not for the recognition task. Following recent studies on multisensory integration in children (e.g., Brandwein, 2010; Gori, 2008), we then tested performance in children (i.e., 8–14 year olds) using the same task. Although overall performance was affected by age, our findings suggest interesting parallels in the benefit of congruent, cross-modal cues between children and adults, for both object recognition and location tasks.

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1. Brandwein A. B. , Foxe J. J. F. , Russo N. , Altschuler T. , Gomes H. , Molholm S. ( 2011). "The development of audiovisual multisensory integration across childhood and early adolescence: A high-density electrical mapping study", Cereb. Cortex Vol 21, 10421055. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhq170
2. Gori M. , Del Viva M. , Sandini G. , Burr D. C. ( 2008). "Young children do not integrate visual and haptic form information", Curr. Biol. Vol 9, 694698. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2008.04.036
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646604
2012-01-01
2016-12-10

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