Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Determinants of the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Determinants of the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Single-trial multisensory learning has been reliably shown to impact the later ability to discriminate images. The present study had the following three aims: (1) to determine if single-trial multisensory learning would elicit corresponding effects on auditory discrimination, (2) to determine if there were links between the impact of multisensory sensory learning on auditory discrimination and its impact on visual discrimination within individual participants, and (3) to determine the bases of inter-individual differences in the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning. On two sessions separated by one week, participants discriminated initial from repeated presentations of either images or sounds during a continuous recognition task. Half of the initial presentations were auditory–visual multisensory parings (semantically congruent, semantically incongruent, or meaningless). The remaining half of initial presentations was unisensory. Half of the repeated stimuli were presented in an identical manner to their initial encounter, and the remaining half were presented in the complementary manner (i.e., those initially presented in a unisensory manner were now presented as multisensory pairs and vice versa). The results show that the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning across the senses varies according to an individual’s propensity to exhibit repetition priming with sounds (i.e., faster RTs and higher accuracy for repeated vs. initial unisensory sound presentations). Individuals exhibiting such priming also showed facilitative effects of single-trial multisensory learning on both the auditory and visual discrimination tasks. Those who did not exhibit such priming did not benefit from single-trial multisensory learning. Single-trial multisensory learning is therefore an effective tool across the senses.

Affiliations: 1: The Functional Electrical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Vaudois University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, CH

Single-trial multisensory learning has been reliably shown to impact the later ability to discriminate images. The present study had the following three aims: (1) to determine if single-trial multisensory learning would elicit corresponding effects on auditory discrimination, (2) to determine if there were links between the impact of multisensory sensory learning on auditory discrimination and its impact on visual discrimination within individual participants, and (3) to determine the bases of inter-individual differences in the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning. On two sessions separated by one week, participants discriminated initial from repeated presentations of either images or sounds during a continuous recognition task. Half of the initial presentations were auditory–visual multisensory parings (semantically congruent, semantically incongruent, or meaningless). The remaining half of initial presentations was unisensory. Half of the repeated stimuli were presented in an identical manner to their initial encounter, and the remaining half were presented in the complementary manner (i.e., those initially presented in a unisensory manner were now presented as multisensory pairs and vice versa). The results show that the efficacy of single-trial multisensory learning across the senses varies according to an individual’s propensity to exhibit repetition priming with sounds (i.e., faster RTs and higher accuracy for repeated vs. initial unisensory sound presentations). Individuals exhibiting such priming also showed facilitative effects of single-trial multisensory learning on both the auditory and visual discrimination tasks. Those who did not exhibit such priming did not benefit from single-trial multisensory learning. Single-trial multisensory learning is therefore an effective tool across the senses.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S036_text.html;jsessionid=NkDzFpxpgfOoe8Z0IPFGPvWP.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646613&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646613
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646613
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646613
2012-01-01
2016-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation