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Full Access Using audiovisual feedback during speaking

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Using audiovisual feedback during speaking

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

The sensory systems have an important role in speech production. Monitoring sensory consequences of articulatory movements supports fluent speaking. It is well known that delayed auditory feedback disrupts fluency of speech. Also, there is some evidence that immediate visual feedback, i.e., seeing one’s own articulatory movements in a mirror, decreases the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback (Jones and Striemer, 2007). It is unknown whether delayed visual feedback affects fluency of speech. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of delayed auditory, visual and audiovisual feedback on speech fluency. 20 native English speakers (with no history of speech and language problems) participated in the experiment. Participants received delayed (200 ms) or immediate auditory feedback, whilst repeating sentences. Moreover, they received either no visual feedback, immediate visual feedback or delayed visual feedback (200, 400, 600 ms). Under delayed auditory feedback, the duration of sentences was longer and number of speech errors was greater than under immediate auditory feedback, confirming that delayed auditory feedback disrupts speech. Immediate visual feedback had no effect on speech fluency. Importantly, fluency of speech was most disrupted when both auditory and visual feedback was delayed, suggesting that delayed visual feedback strengthened the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback. However, delayed visual feedback combined with immediate auditory feedback had no effect on speech fluency. Our findings demonstrate that although visual feedback is not available during speaking in every-day life, it can be integrated with auditory feedback and influence fluency of speech.

Affiliations: 1: University of Oxford, GB

The sensory systems have an important role in speech production. Monitoring sensory consequences of articulatory movements supports fluent speaking. It is well known that delayed auditory feedback disrupts fluency of speech. Also, there is some evidence that immediate visual feedback, i.e., seeing one’s own articulatory movements in a mirror, decreases the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback (Jones and Striemer, 2007). It is unknown whether delayed visual feedback affects fluency of speech. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of delayed auditory, visual and audiovisual feedback on speech fluency. 20 native English speakers (with no history of speech and language problems) participated in the experiment. Participants received delayed (200 ms) or immediate auditory feedback, whilst repeating sentences. Moreover, they received either no visual feedback, immediate visual feedback or delayed visual feedback (200, 400, 600 ms). Under delayed auditory feedback, the duration of sentences was longer and number of speech errors was greater than under immediate auditory feedback, confirming that delayed auditory feedback disrupts speech. Immediate visual feedback had no effect on speech fluency. Importantly, fluency of speech was most disrupted when both auditory and visual feedback was delayed, suggesting that delayed visual feedback strengthened the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback. However, delayed visual feedback combined with immediate auditory feedback had no effect on speech fluency. Our findings demonstrate that although visual feedback is not available during speaking in every-day life, it can be integrated with auditory feedback and influence fluency of speech.

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1. Jones J. A. , Striemer D. ( 2007). "Speech disruption during delayed auditory feedback with simultaneous visual feedback", Journal of the Acoustical Society of America Vol 122, 135141. http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.2735809
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646703
2012-01-01
2016-12-06

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