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Full Access Crossmodal correspondences

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Crossmodal correspondences

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image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

For more than a century now, researchers have acknowledged the existence of crossmodal congruency effects between dimensions of sensory stimuli in the general (i.e., non-synesthetic) population. Such phenomena, known by a variety of terms including ‘crossmodal correspondences’, involve individual stimulus properties, rely on a crossmodal mapping of unisensory features, and appear to be shared by the majority of individuals. Over the last few years, a number of studies have shed light on many key aspects of crossmodal correspondences, ranging from their role in multisensory integration, their developmental trajectories, their occurrence in non-human mammals, their neural underpinning and the role of learning. I will present a brief overview of the latest findings on crossmodal correspondences, highlight standing questions and provide direction for future research.

Affiliations: 1: 3Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Bielefeld, DE

For more than a century now, researchers have acknowledged the existence of crossmodal congruency effects between dimensions of sensory stimuli in the general (i.e., non-synesthetic) population. Such phenomena, known by a variety of terms including ‘crossmodal correspondences’, involve individual stimulus properties, rely on a crossmodal mapping of unisensory features, and appear to be shared by the majority of individuals. Over the last few years, a number of studies have shed light on many key aspects of crossmodal correspondences, ranging from their role in multisensory integration, their developmental trajectories, their occurrence in non-human mammals, their neural underpinning and the role of learning. I will present a brief overview of the latest findings on crossmodal correspondences, highlight standing questions and provide direction for future research.

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2012-01-01
2016-12-04

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