Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Crossmodal correspondences, crossmodal completion and crossmodal imagery

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Crossmodal correspondences, crossmodal completion and crossmodal imagery

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Crossmodal correspondences can be defined as tendency to match a sensory feature/dimension, either presented or imagined, to another sensory feature/dimension, either presented or imagined, in another modality. They start to be documented across all modalities (see Spence, 2011 for a review) but both their etiology and role remain to be explored. Crossmodal correspondences, such as those holding between auditory pitch and visual brightness or size have been showed to exert an influence on multisensory perception when two congruent cues are presented together (e.g., Parise and Spence, 2008, 2009). Here, following the framework exposed in Spence and Deroy (in press), I show that crossmodal correspondences can also play two others roles, that is in crossmodal completion and in crossmodal imagery. As such, crossmodal correspondences can explain phenomena such as silent-lip reading or certain aspects of musical imagery that other models want to attribute either to ubiquituous synaesthetic effects (Ward, 2011) or emotional congruence (Palmer et al., 2011).

Affiliations: 1: Centre for the Study of the Senses, School of Advanced Study, University of London, GB

Crossmodal correspondences can be defined as tendency to match a sensory feature/dimension, either presented or imagined, to another sensory feature/dimension, either presented or imagined, in another modality. They start to be documented across all modalities (see Spence, 2011 for a review) but both their etiology and role remain to be explored. Crossmodal correspondences, such as those holding between auditory pitch and visual brightness or size have been showed to exert an influence on multisensory perception when two congruent cues are presented together (e.g., Parise and Spence, 2008, 2009). Here, following the framework exposed in Spence and Deroy (in press), I show that crossmodal correspondences can also play two others roles, that is in crossmodal completion and in crossmodal imagery. As such, crossmodal correspondences can explain phenomena such as silent-lip reading or certain aspects of musical imagery that other models want to attribute either to ubiquituous synaesthetic effects (Ward, 2011) or emotional congruence (Palmer et al., 2011).

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S069_text.html;jsessionid=hSSiMmyorpdSlFY_TK744kV8.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646947&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646947
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Palmer S. E. , Langlois T. , Tsang T. , Schloss K. B. , Levitin D. J. ( 2011). Color, music, and emotion. Poster presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society, Naples.
2. Parise C. , Spence C. ( 2008). "Synesthetic congruency modulates the temporal ventriloquism effect", Neuroscience Letters Vol 442, 257261. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2008.07.010
3. Parise C. , Spence C. ( 2009). "“When birds of a feather flock together”: Synesthetic correspondences modulate audiovisual integration in non-synesthetes", PLoS ONE Vol 4, e5664. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0005664
4. Spence C. , Deroy O. (in press). "Crossmodal mental imagery", in: Multisensory Imagery: Theory and Applications, Lacey S. , Lawson R. (Eds). Springer, New York.
5. Ward J. ( 2011). "Visual music in arts and minds: Explorations with synaesthesia", in: Art and the Senses, Bacci F. , Melcher D. (Eds), pp.  481494. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646947
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646947
2012-01-01
2016-12-03

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation