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Full Access Spatial and temporal dynamics of visual processing during movement preparation: ERP evidence from adults with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

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Spatial and temporal dynamics of visual processing during movement preparation: ERP evidence from adults with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Experimental evidence has shown that the actions we intend to perform influence the way our visual system processes information in the environment, consistent with the considerable overlap observed between brain circuits involved in action and attention. Conceptual thinking about action-perception links in cognitive science is heavily influenced by earlier work that has established that motor preparation causes a shift of attention to the goal of a movement. This sensory enhancement is characterised on a behavioural level by improved detection and discrimination performance at that location, and neurally by larger responses in visual cortex to stimuli presented there. In a series of experiments we examined electrophysiological visual cortex responses (ERPs) to task-irrelevant visual probe stimuli presented at various locations in movement space during preparation of manual reaching movements. The data from these experiments show simultaneous enhanced visual processing of stimuli at the location of the effector about to perform the movement and at the goal of the movement. Further, our data demonstrates that compared to controls, adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder show a markedly different pattern of enhanced visual processing during preparation of more complex reaching movement, i.e., across the body midline. This suggests a specific difficulty in this group in recruiting appropriate preparatory visual mechanism for manual movements, which may be related to the difficulties this group experiences in their daily life.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, GB

Experimental evidence has shown that the actions we intend to perform influence the way our visual system processes information in the environment, consistent with the considerable overlap observed between brain circuits involved in action and attention. Conceptual thinking about action-perception links in cognitive science is heavily influenced by earlier work that has established that motor preparation causes a shift of attention to the goal of a movement. This sensory enhancement is characterised on a behavioural level by improved detection and discrimination performance at that location, and neurally by larger responses in visual cortex to stimuli presented there. In a series of experiments we examined electrophysiological visual cortex responses (ERPs) to task-irrelevant visual probe stimuli presented at various locations in movement space during preparation of manual reaching movements. The data from these experiments show simultaneous enhanced visual processing of stimuli at the location of the effector about to perform the movement and at the goal of the movement. Further, our data demonstrates that compared to controls, adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder show a markedly different pattern of enhanced visual processing during preparation of more complex reaching movement, i.e., across the body midline. This suggests a specific difficulty in this group in recruiting appropriate preparatory visual mechanism for manual movements, which may be related to the difficulties this group experiences in their daily life.

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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x646965
2012-01-01
2016-12-10

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