Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Short and sweet, or long and complex? Perceiving temporal synchrony in audiovisual events

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Short and sweet, or long and complex? Perceiving temporal synchrony in audiovisual events

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Perceived synchrony varies depending on the audiovisual event. Typically, asynchrony is tolerated at greater lead- and lag-times for speech and music than for action events. The tolerance for asynchrony in speech has been attributed to the unity assumption, which proposes a bonding of auditory and visual speech cues through associations in several dimensions. However, the variations in synchrony perception for different audiovisual events may simply be related to their complexity; where speech and music fluctuate naturally, actions involve isolated events and anticipated moments of impact. The current study measured perception of synchrony for long (13 s) and short (1 s) variants of three types of stimuli: (1) action, represented by a game of chess, (2) music, played by a drummer and (3) speech, presented by an anchorwoman in a newscast. The long variants allowed events to play out with their natural dynamics, whereas short variants offered controlled and predictable single actions or events, selected from the longer segments. Results show that among the long stimuli, lead asynchrony was detected sooner for speech than for chess. This contrasts both with previous research and our own predictions, although it may be related to characteristics of the selected chess scene. Interestingly, tolerance to asynchrony was generally greater for short, than for long, stimuli, especially for speech. These findings suggest that the dynamics of complex events cannot account for previously observed differences in synchrony perception between speech and action events.

Affiliations: 1: 1Simula Research Laboratory, The University of Oslo, NO; 2: 2Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO

Perceived synchrony varies depending on the audiovisual event. Typically, asynchrony is tolerated at greater lead- and lag-times for speech and music than for action events. The tolerance for asynchrony in speech has been attributed to the unity assumption, which proposes a bonding of auditory and visual speech cues through associations in several dimensions. However, the variations in synchrony perception for different audiovisual events may simply be related to their complexity; where speech and music fluctuate naturally, actions involve isolated events and anticipated moments of impact. The current study measured perception of synchrony for long (13 s) and short (1 s) variants of three types of stimuli: (1) action, represented by a game of chess, (2) music, played by a drummer and (3) speech, presented by an anchorwoman in a newscast. The long variants allowed events to play out with their natural dynamics, whereas short variants offered controlled and predictable single actions or events, selected from the longer segments. Results show that among the long stimuli, lead asynchrony was detected sooner for speech than for chess. This contrasts both with previous research and our own predictions, although it may be related to characteristics of the selected chess scene. Interestingly, tolerance to asynchrony was generally greater for short, than for long, stimuli, especially for speech. These findings suggest that the dynamics of complex events cannot account for previously observed differences in synchrony perception between speech and action events.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S090_text.html;jsessionid=gvAyV7UYn0SQn7xWUGtDoqVD.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647298&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647298
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647298
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647298
2012-01-01
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation