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Full Access Changes in temporal binding related to decreased vestibular input

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Changes in temporal binding related to decreased vestibular input

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Imbalance among patients with vestibular hypofunction has been related to inadequate compensatory eye movements in response to head movements. However, symptoms of imbalance might also occur due a temporal mismatch between vestibular and other balance-related sensory cues. This temporal mismatch could be reflected in a widened temporal binding window (TBW), or the length of time over which simultaneous sensory stimuli may be offset and still perceived as simultaneous. We hypothesized that decreased vestibular input would lead to a widening of the temporal binding window. We performed whole-body rotations about the earth-vertical axis following a sinusoidal trajectory at 0.5 Hz with a peak velocity of 60°/s in four normal subjects. Dichotic auditory clicks were presented through headphones at various phases relative to the rotations. Subjects were asked to indicate whether the cues were synchronous or asynchronous and the TBW was calculated. We then simulated decreased vestibular input by rotating at diminished peak velocities of 48, 24 and 12°/s in four normal subjects. TBW was calculated between ±1 SD away from the mean on the psychometric curve. We found that the TBW increases as amplitude of rotation decreases. Average TBW of 251 ms at 60°/s increased to 309 ms at 12°/s. This result leads to the novel conclusion that changes in temporal processing may be a mechanism for imbalance in patients with vestibular hypofunction.

Affiliations: 1: Washington University School of Medicine, US

Imbalance among patients with vestibular hypofunction has been related to inadequate compensatory eye movements in response to head movements. However, symptoms of imbalance might also occur due a temporal mismatch between vestibular and other balance-related sensory cues. This temporal mismatch could be reflected in a widened temporal binding window (TBW), or the length of time over which simultaneous sensory stimuli may be offset and still perceived as simultaneous. We hypothesized that decreased vestibular input would lead to a widening of the temporal binding window. We performed whole-body rotations about the earth-vertical axis following a sinusoidal trajectory at 0.5 Hz with a peak velocity of 60°/s in four normal subjects. Dichotic auditory clicks were presented through headphones at various phases relative to the rotations. Subjects were asked to indicate whether the cues were synchronous or asynchronous and the TBW was calculated. We then simulated decreased vestibular input by rotating at diminished peak velocities of 48, 24 and 12°/s in four normal subjects. TBW was calculated between ±1 SD away from the mean on the psychometric curve. We found that the TBW increases as amplitude of rotation decreases. Average TBW of 251 ms at 60°/s increased to 309 ms at 12°/s. This result leads to the novel conclusion that changes in temporal processing may be a mechanism for imbalance in patients with vestibular hypofunction.

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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647397
2012-01-01
2016-12-08

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