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Full Access Effects of full body vibration on the perceived sense of verisimilitude and sense of presence

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Effects of full body vibration on the perceived sense of verisimilitude and sense of presence

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

High-definition multimodal displays are necessary to advance information and communications technologies. Such systems mainly present audio–visual information because this sensory information includes rich spatiotemporal information. Recently, not only audio–visual information but also other sensory information, for example touch, smell, and vibration, has come to be presented easily. The potential of such information is expanded to realize high-definition multimodal displays. We specifically examined the effects of full body vibration information on perceived reality from audio–visual content. As indexes of perceived reality, we used the sense of presence and the sense of verisimilitude. The latter is the appreciative role of foreground components in multimodal contents, although the former is related more closely to background components included in a scene. Our previous report described differences of characteristics of both senses to audio–visual contents (Kanda et al., IMRF2011). In the present experiments, various amounts of full body vibration were presented with an audio–visual movie, which was recorded via a camera and microphone set on wheelchair. Participants reported the amounts of perceived sense of presence and verisimilitude. Results revealed that the intensity of full body vibration characterized both senses differently. The sense of presence increased linearly according to the intensity of full body vibration, while the sense of verisimilitude showed a nonlinear tendency. These results suggest that not only audio–visual information but also full body vibration is importantto develop high-definition multimodal displays.

Affiliations: 1: 1Research Institute of Electrical Communication and Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University, JP; 2: 2Faculty of General Welfare, Tohoku Fukushi University, JP; 3: 3Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, JP; 4: 4Graduate School of Arts & Letters, Tohoku University, JP

High-definition multimodal displays are necessary to advance information and communications technologies. Such systems mainly present audio–visual information because this sensory information includes rich spatiotemporal information. Recently, not only audio–visual information but also other sensory information, for example touch, smell, and vibration, has come to be presented easily. The potential of such information is expanded to realize high-definition multimodal displays. We specifically examined the effects of full body vibration information on perceived reality from audio–visual content. As indexes of perceived reality, we used the sense of presence and the sense of verisimilitude. The latter is the appreciative role of foreground components in multimodal contents, although the former is related more closely to background components included in a scene. Our previous report described differences of characteristics of both senses to audio–visual contents (Kanda et al., IMRF2011). In the present experiments, various amounts of full body vibration were presented with an audio–visual movie, which was recorded via a camera and microphone set on wheelchair. Participants reported the amounts of perceived sense of presence and verisimilitude. Results revealed that the intensity of full body vibration characterized both senses differently. The sense of presence increased linearly according to the intensity of full body vibration, while the sense of verisimilitude showed a nonlinear tendency. These results suggest that not only audio–visual information but also full body vibration is importantto develop high-definition multimodal displays.

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1. Kanda T., Honda A., Shibata H., Asai N., Teramoto W., Sakamoto S., Iwaya Y., Gyoba J., Suzuki Y. (2011). The sense of verisimilitude has different spatial–temporal characteristics from those producing the sense of presence in the evaluation process of audiovisual contents, IMRF2011.
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647441
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647441
2012-01-01
2016-12-04

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