Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Recovery periods of event-related potentials indicating crossmodal interactions between the visual, auditory and tactile system

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Recovery periods of event-related potentials indicating crossmodal interactions between the visual, auditory and tactile system

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

In sequential unimodal stimulus designs the time it takes for an event-related potential (ERP)-amplitude to recover is often interpreted as a transient decrement in responsiveness of the generating cortical circuits. This effect has been called neural refractoriness, which is the larger the more similar the repeated stimuli are and thus indicates the degree of overlap between the neural generator systems activated by two sequential stimuli. We hypothesize that crossmodal refractoriness-effects in a crossmodal sequential design might be a good parameter to assess the ‘modality overlap’ in the involved neural generators and the degree of crossmodal interaction. In order to investigate crossmodal ERP refractory period effects we presented visual and auditory (Experiment 1) and visual and tactile stimuli (Experiment 2) with inter stimulus intervals of 1 and 2 s to adult participants. Participants had to detect rare auditory and visual stimuli. Both, intra- and crossmodal ISI effects for all modalities were found for three investigated ERP-deflections (P1, N1, P2). The topography of the crossmodal refractory period effect of the N1- and P2-deflections in Experiment 1 and of P1 and N1 in Experiment 2 of both modalities was similar to the corresponding intramodal refractory effect, yet more confined and crossmodal effects were generally weaker. The crossmodal refractory effect for the visual P1, however, had a distinct, less circumscribed topography with respect to the intramodal effect. These results suggest that ERP refractory effects might be a promising indicator of the neural correlates of crossmodal interactions.

Affiliations: 1: University of Hamburg, DE

In sequential unimodal stimulus designs the time it takes for an event-related potential (ERP)-amplitude to recover is often interpreted as a transient decrement in responsiveness of the generating cortical circuits. This effect has been called neural refractoriness, which is the larger the more similar the repeated stimuli are and thus indicates the degree of overlap between the neural generator systems activated by two sequential stimuli. We hypothesize that crossmodal refractoriness-effects in a crossmodal sequential design might be a good parameter to assess the ‘modality overlap’ in the involved neural generators and the degree of crossmodal interaction. In order to investigate crossmodal ERP refractory period effects we presented visual and auditory (Experiment 1) and visual and tactile stimuli (Experiment 2) with inter stimulus intervals of 1 and 2 s to adult participants. Participants had to detect rare auditory and visual stimuli. Both, intra- and crossmodal ISI effects for all modalities were found for three investigated ERP-deflections (P1, N1, P2). The topography of the crossmodal refractory period effect of the N1- and P2-deflections in Experiment 1 and of P1 and N1 in Experiment 2 of both modalities was similar to the corresponding intramodal refractory effect, yet more confined and crossmodal effects were generally weaker. The crossmodal refractory effect for the visual P1, however, had a distinct, less circumscribed topography with respect to the intramodal effect. These results suggest that ERP refractory effects might be a promising indicator of the neural correlates of crossmodal interactions.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S106_text.html;jsessionid=6tuSyOSdFZJK_rr-5-ahdF0t.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647478&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647478
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647478
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647478
2012-01-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation