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Full Access Response type and sex differences in a tactile temporal order judgment task with tools

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Response type and sex differences in a tactile temporal order judgment task with tools

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We presented participants with a temporal order judgment (TOJ) task with vibratory stimuli presented to the ends of held tools. We manipulated whether the hands and tools were uncrossed or crossed, predicting that participants would respond more accurately if the responding body part and tool tip were in the same hemispace (see Yamamoto and Kitazawa, 2001). Participants were split into two groups (24 subjects in each group). One group responded manually with the stimulated tools, the other group responded with foot pedals. Contrasting previous findings, we found no significant effect of manipulating tool position when the hands were uncrossed, regardless of response type. Effects of response type were also observed, as participants were significantly more accurate when responding with the stimulated tools compared to responding with foot pedals. Interactions were also found between response type and sex. Compared to males, females made a substantially greater number of confusion errors when responding with feet, but not when responding with tools. Additionally, compared to males, females made substantially more confusion errors with the arms crossed, reflecting previously reported results in tactile TOJ on the hands (Cadieux et al., 2010). These results suggest potential differences in spatial mapping and tactile processing in males and females.

Affiliations: 1: Haverford College, US

We presented participants with a temporal order judgment (TOJ) task with vibratory stimuli presented to the ends of held tools. We manipulated whether the hands and tools were uncrossed or crossed, predicting that participants would respond more accurately if the responding body part and tool tip were in the same hemispace (see Yamamoto and Kitazawa, 2001). Participants were split into two groups (24 subjects in each group). One group responded manually with the stimulated tools, the other group responded with foot pedals. Contrasting previous findings, we found no significant effect of manipulating tool position when the hands were uncrossed, regardless of response type. Effects of response type were also observed, as participants were significantly more accurate when responding with the stimulated tools compared to responding with foot pedals. Interactions were also found between response type and sex. Compared to males, females made a substantially greater number of confusion errors when responding with feet, but not when responding with tools. Additionally, compared to males, females made substantially more confusion errors with the arms crossed, reflecting previously reported results in tactile TOJ on the hands (Cadieux et al., 2010). These results suggest potential differences in spatial mapping and tactile processing in males and females.

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1. Cadieux M. L. , Barnett-Cowan M. , Shore D. I. ( 2010). "Crossing the hands is more confusing for females than males", Exp. Brain Res. Vol 204, 431446. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-010-2268-5
2. Yamamoto S. , Kitazawa S. ( 2001). "Sensation at the tips of invisible tools", Nat. Neurosci. Vol 4, 979980. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn721
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647531
2012-01-01
2016-12-09

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