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Full Access Aesthetic preferences for tridimensional shapes: A comparison between vision and touch

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Aesthetic preferences for tridimensional shapes: A comparison between vision and touch

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Aesthetic preferences for different shapes have been investigated in vision but not in touch. Here the visual and tactile pleasantness of 3-dimensional shapes has been studied in two experiments. In Experiment 1, the participants evaluated the tactile pleasantness of two shapes (a sphere and a cube), manipulated with right, left or both hands. The results revealed that the sphere was preferred over the cube in all the exploration conditions. Moreover, the cube was preferred more when explored bimanually than when explored unimanually. In Experiment 2, the participants evaluated pleasantness and angularity of 11 shapes, presented under visual and haptic exploration conditions. Curved shapes (e.g., cylinder) evoked more pleasant ratings compared to angular shapes in both sensorial conditions. Interestingly, certain shapes (e.g., triangle, rhombus) were preferred significantly more when visually presented than when haptically explored. These results provide some preliminary insights into the cognitive and neural differences in the processing of the aesthetic qualities of visual and tactile stimuli.

Affiliations: 1: 1University of Milan-Bicocca, IT; 2: 2Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, GB

Aesthetic preferences for different shapes have been investigated in vision but not in touch. Here the visual and tactile pleasantness of 3-dimensional shapes has been studied in two experiments. In Experiment 1, the participants evaluated the tactile pleasantness of two shapes (a sphere and a cube), manipulated with right, left or both hands. The results revealed that the sphere was preferred over the cube in all the exploration conditions. Moreover, the cube was preferred more when explored bimanually than when explored unimanually. In Experiment 2, the participants evaluated pleasantness and angularity of 11 shapes, presented under visual and haptic exploration conditions. Curved shapes (e.g., cylinder) evoked more pleasant ratings compared to angular shapes in both sensorial conditions. Interestingly, certain shapes (e.g., triangle, rhombus) were preferred significantly more when visually presented than when haptically explored. These results provide some preliminary insights into the cognitive and neural differences in the processing of the aesthetic qualities of visual and tactile stimuli.

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2012-01-01
2016-12-05

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