Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Spatial recoding of sound: Pitch-varying auditory cues modulate up/down visual spatial attention

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Spatial recoding of sound: Pitch-varying auditory cues modulate up/down visual spatial attention

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Previous studies suggest the existence of facilitatory effects between, for example, responding upwards/downwards while hearing a high/low-pitched tone, respectively (e.g., Occeli et al., 2009; Rusconi et al., 2006). Neuroimaging research has started to reveal the activation of parietal areas (e.g., the intraparietal sulcus, IPS) during the performance of various pitch-based musical tasks (see Foster and Zatorre, 2010a, 2010b). Since several areas in the parietal cortex (e.g., the IPS; see Chica et al., 2011) are strongly involved in orienting visual attention towards external events, we investigated the possible effects of perceiving pitch-varying stimuli (i.e., ‘ascending’ or ‘descending’ flutter sounds) on the spatial processing of visual stimuli. In a variation of the Posner cueing paradigm (Posner, 1980), participants performed a speeded detection task of a visual target that could appear at one of four different spatial positions (two above and two below the fixation point). Irrelevant ascending (200–700 Hz) or descending (700–200 Hz) flutter sounds were randomly presented 550 ms before the onset of the visual target. According to our results, faster reaction times were observed when the visual target appeared in a position (up/down) that was compatible with the ‘pitch direction’ (ascending or descending) of the previously-presented auditory ‘cuing’ stimulus. Our findings suggest that pitch-varying sounds are recoded spatially, thus modulating visual spatial attention.

Affiliations: 1: CIBERSAM, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, University of Barcelona, ES

Previous studies suggest the existence of facilitatory effects between, for example, responding upwards/downwards while hearing a high/low-pitched tone, respectively (e.g., Occeli et al., 2009; Rusconi et al., 2006). Neuroimaging research has started to reveal the activation of parietal areas (e.g., the intraparietal sulcus, IPS) during the performance of various pitch-based musical tasks (see Foster and Zatorre, 2010a, 2010b). Since several areas in the parietal cortex (e.g., the IPS; see Chica et al., 2011) are strongly involved in orienting visual attention towards external events, we investigated the possible effects of perceiving pitch-varying stimuli (i.e., ‘ascending’ or ‘descending’ flutter sounds) on the spatial processing of visual stimuli. In a variation of the Posner cueing paradigm (Posner, 1980), participants performed a speeded detection task of a visual target that could appear at one of four different spatial positions (two above and two below the fixation point). Irrelevant ascending (200–700 Hz) or descending (700–200 Hz) flutter sounds were randomly presented 550 ms before the onset of the visual target. According to our results, faster reaction times were observed when the visual target appeared in a position (up/down) that was compatible with the ‘pitch direction’ (ascending or descending) of the previously-presented auditory ‘cuing’ stimulus. Our findings suggest that pitch-varying sounds are recoded spatially, thus modulating visual spatial attention.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S141_text.html;jsessionid=ayNZAZhX_LSzQEGtJryQkGVg.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647829&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647829
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Chica A. B. , Bartolomeo P. , Valero-Cabre A. ( 2011). "Dorsal and ventral parietal contributions to spatial orienting in the human brain", Journal of Neuroscience Vol 31, 81438149. http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5463-10.2010
2. Foster N. E. V. , Zatorre R. J. ( 2010a). "A role for the intraparietal sulcus in transforming musical pitch information", Cerebral Cortex Vol 20, 13501359. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhp199
3. Foster N. E. V. , Zatorre R. J. ( 2010b). "Cortical structure predicts success in performing musical transformation judgments", NeuroImage Vol 53, 2636. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.06.042
4. Occelli V. , Spence C. , Zampini M. ( 2011). "Audiotactile interactions in front and rear space", Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews Vol 35, 589598. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.07.004
5. Posner M. I. ( 1980). "Orienting of attention", Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Vol 32, 2325. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00335558008248231
6. Rusconi E. , Kwan B. , et al , ( 2006). "Spatial representation of pitch height: the SMARC effect", Cognition Vol 99, 113129. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2005.01.004
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647829
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647829
2012-01-01
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation