Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Synchronisation and correction of stepping to phase-perturbed multisensory metronome cues

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Synchronisation and correction of stepping to phase-perturbed multisensory metronome cues

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

When information is available in more than one sensory modality, the central nervous system will integrate the cues to obtain a statistically optimal estimate of the event or object perceived (Alais and Burr, 2004; Ernst and Banks, 2002). For synchronising movements to a stream of events, this multisensory advantage is observed with reduced temporal variability of the movements compared to unimodal conditions (Elliott et al., 2010, 2011; Wing et al., 2010). Currently, this has been demonstrated for upper limb movements (finger tapping). Here, we investigate synchronisation of lower limb movements (stepping on the spot) to auditory, visual and combined auditory-visual metronome cues. In addition, we compare movement corrections to a phase perturbation in the metronome for the three sensory modality conditions. We hypothesised that, as with upper limb movements, there would be a multisensory advantage, with stepping variability being lowest in the bimodal condition. As such, we further expected correction to the phase perturbation to be quickest in the bimodal condition. Our results show that while we see evidence of multisensory integration taking place, there was no multisensory advantage in the phase correction task — correction under the bimodal condition was almost identical to the auditory-only condition. Both bimodal and auditory-only conditions showed larger corrections for each step after the perturbation, compared to the visual-only condition. We conclude that rapid lower limb corrections are possible when synchronising with salient, regular auditory cues, such that integration of information from other modalities does not improve correction efficiency. However, if the auditory modality is less reliable it is likely that multisensory cues would become advantageous in such a task.

Affiliations: 1: University of Birmingham, GB

When information is available in more than one sensory modality, the central nervous system will integrate the cues to obtain a statistically optimal estimate of the event or object perceived (Alais and Burr, 2004; Ernst and Banks, 2002). For synchronising movements to a stream of events, this multisensory advantage is observed with reduced temporal variability of the movements compared to unimodal conditions (Elliott et al., 2010, 2011; Wing et al., 2010). Currently, this has been demonstrated for upper limb movements (finger tapping). Here, we investigate synchronisation of lower limb movements (stepping on the spot) to auditory, visual and combined auditory-visual metronome cues. In addition, we compare movement corrections to a phase perturbation in the metronome for the three sensory modality conditions. We hypothesised that, as with upper limb movements, there would be a multisensory advantage, with stepping variability being lowest in the bimodal condition. As such, we further expected correction to the phase perturbation to be quickest in the bimodal condition. Our results show that while we see evidence of multisensory integration taking place, there was no multisensory advantage in the phase correction task — correction under the bimodal condition was almost identical to the auditory-only condition. Both bimodal and auditory-only conditions showed larger corrections for each step after the perturbation, compared to the visual-only condition. We conclude that rapid lower limb corrections are possible when synchronising with salient, regular auditory cues, such that integration of information from other modalities does not improve correction efficiency. However, if the auditory modality is less reliable it is likely that multisensory cues would become advantageous in such a task.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S151_text.html;jsessionid=dN3CnRm2JdLQ5nC8EHQqAU0i.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647928&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647928
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Alais D. , Burr D. ( 2004). "The ventriloquist effect results from near-optimal bimodal integration", Curr. Biol. Vol 14, 257262. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2004.01.029
2. Elliott M. T. , Wing A. M. , Welchman A. E. ( 2010). "Multisensory cues improve sensorimotor synchronisation", Europ. J. Neurosci. Vol 31, 18281835. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07205.x
3. Elliott M. T. , Wing A. M. , Welchman A. E. ( 2011). "The effect of ageing on multisensory integration for the control of movement timing", Exp. Brain Res. Vol 213, 291298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-011-2740-x
4. Ernst M. O. , Banks M. S. ( 2002). "Humans integrate visual and haptic information in a statistically optimal fashion", Nature Vol 415, 429433. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/415429a
5. Wing A. M. , Doumas M. , Welchman A. E. ( 2010). "Combining multisensory temporal information for movement synchronisation", Exp. Brain Res. Vol 200, 277282. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-009-2134-5
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647928
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647928
2012-01-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation