Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access The size of the ventriloquist effect is modulated by emotional valence

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The size of the ventriloquist effect is modulated by emotional valence

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Seeing and Perceiving
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

It is currently unknown to what extent the integration of inputs from different modalities are subject to the influence of attention, emotion, and/or motivation. The ventriloquist effect is widely assumed to be an automatic, crossmodal phenomenon, normally shifting the perceived location of an auditory stimulus toward a concurrently-presented visual stimulus. The present study examined whether audiovisual binding, as indicated by the magnitude of the ventriloquist effect, is influenced by threatening auditory stimuli presented prior to the ventriloquist experiment. Syllables spoken in a fearful voice were presented from one of eight loudspeakers while syllables spoken in a neutral voice were presented from the other seven locations. Subsequently, participants had to localize pure tones while trying to ignore concurrent light flashes (both of which were emotionally neutral). A reliable ventriloquist effect was observed. The emotional stimulus manipulation resulted in a reduced ventriloquist effect in both hemifields, as compared to a control group exposed to a similar attention-capturing but non-emotional manipulation. These results suggest that the emotional system is capable of influencing crossmodal binding processes which have heretofore been considered as being automatic.

Affiliations: 1: 1Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology, University of Hamburg, DE; 2: 2Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, GB

It is currently unknown to what extent the integration of inputs from different modalities are subject to the influence of attention, emotion, and/or motivation. The ventriloquist effect is widely assumed to be an automatic, crossmodal phenomenon, normally shifting the perceived location of an auditory stimulus toward a concurrently-presented visual stimulus. The present study examined whether audiovisual binding, as indicated by the magnitude of the ventriloquist effect, is influenced by threatening auditory stimuli presented prior to the ventriloquist experiment. Syllables spoken in a fearful voice were presented from one of eight loudspeakers while syllables spoken in a neutral voice were presented from the other seven locations. Subsequently, participants had to localize pure tones while trying to ignore concurrent light flashes (both of which were emotionally neutral). A reliable ventriloquist effect was observed. The emotional stimulus manipulation resulted in a reduced ventriloquist effect in both hemifields, as compared to a control group exposed to a similar attention-capturing but non-emotional manipulation. These results suggest that the emotional system is capable of influencing crossmodal binding processes which have heretofore been considered as being automatic.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/18784763/25/0/18784763_025_00_S155_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647964&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647964
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647964
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x647964
2012-01-01
2017-09-23

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation