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Full Access Providing a human user artificial ability to control their eyes independently with various eye movement patterns

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Providing a human user artificial ability to control their eyes independently with various eye movement patterns

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Humans have the capability to flexibly adapt to visual stimulation, such as spatial inversion in which a person wears glasses that display images upside down for long periods of time (Ewert, 1930; Snyder and Pronko, 1952; Stratton, 1887). To investigate feasibility of extension of vision and the flexible adaptation of the human visual system with binocular rivalry, we developed a system that provides a human user with the artificial oculomotor ability to control their eyes independently for arbitrary directions, and we named the system Virtual Chameleon having to do with Chameleons (Mizuno et al., 2010, 2011). The successful users of the system were able to actively control visual axes by manipulating 3D sensors held by their both hands, to watch independent fields of view presented to the left and right eyes, and to look around as chameleons do. Although it was thought that those independent fields of view provided to the user were formed by eye movements control corresponding to pursuit movements on human, the system did not have control systems to perform saccadic movements and compensatory movements as numerous animals including human do. Fluctuations in dominance and suppression with binocular rivalry are irregular, but it is possible to bias these fluctuations by boosting the strength of one rival image over the other (Blake and Logothetis, 2002). It was assumed that visual stimuli induced by various eye movements affect predominance. Therefore, in this research, we focused on influenced of patterns of eye movements on visual perception with binocular rivalry, and implemented functions to produce saccadic movements in Virtual Chameleon.

Affiliations: 1: 1Tohoku Institute of Technology, JP; 2: 2Tohoku University, JP

Humans have the capability to flexibly adapt to visual stimulation, such as spatial inversion in which a person wears glasses that display images upside down for long periods of time (Ewert, 1930; Snyder and Pronko, 1952; Stratton, 1887). To investigate feasibility of extension of vision and the flexible adaptation of the human visual system with binocular rivalry, we developed a system that provides a human user with the artificial oculomotor ability to control their eyes independently for arbitrary directions, and we named the system Virtual Chameleon having to do with Chameleons (Mizuno et al., 2010, 2011). The successful users of the system were able to actively control visual axes by manipulating 3D sensors held by their both hands, to watch independent fields of view presented to the left and right eyes, and to look around as chameleons do. Although it was thought that those independent fields of view provided to the user were formed by eye movements control corresponding to pursuit movements on human, the system did not have control systems to perform saccadic movements and compensatory movements as numerous animals including human do. Fluctuations in dominance and suppression with binocular rivalry are irregular, but it is possible to bias these fluctuations by boosting the strength of one rival image over the other (Blake and Logothetis, 2002). It was assumed that visual stimuli induced by various eye movements affect predominance. Therefore, in this research, we focused on influenced of patterns of eye movements on visual perception with binocular rivalry, and implemented functions to produce saccadic movements in Virtual Chameleon.

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1. Blake R. , Logothetis N. K. ( 2002). "Visual competition", Nature Reviews Neuroscience Vol 3, 111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrn701
2. Ewert P. W. ( 1930). "A study of the effect of inverted retinal stimulation upon spatially coordinated behavior", Genetic Psychology Monographs Child Behavior, Animal Behavior, and Comparative Psychology Vol 7, 177363.
3. Mizuno F. , Hayasaka T. , Yamaguchi T. ( 2010). A portable device to represent different views to both eyes, in: Proc. the 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS, pp. 3210–3213.
4. Mizuno F. , Hayasaka T. , Yamaguchi T. ( 2011). A fundamental evaluation of human performance with use of a device to present different two-eyesight both eyes, in: 5th European Conference of International Federation Medical and Biological Engineering 2011, Proc. of IFMBE, Vol. 37, pp. 1176–1179.
5. Snyder F. W. , Pronko N. H. ( 1952). Vision with Spatial Inversion. University of Witchita Press, Witchita, Kansas.
6. Stratton G. M. ( 1887). "Vision without inversion of the retinal image", Psychological Review Vol 4, 341360. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0075482
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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648017
2012-01-01
2016-12-11

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