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Full Access Auditory modulation of oscillatory activity in extra-striate visual cortex and its contribution to audio–visual multisensory integration: A human intracranial EEG study

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Auditory modulation of oscillatory activity in extra-striate visual cortex and its contribution to audio–visual multisensory integration: A human intracranial EEG study

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For more content, see Multisensory Research and Spatial Vision.

Investigations have traditionally focused on activity in the sensory cortices as a function of their respective sensory inputs. However, converging evidence from multisensory research has shown that neural activity in a given sensory region can be modulated by stimulation of other so-called ancillary sensory systems. Both electrophysiology and functional imaging support the occurrence of multisensory processing in human sensory cortex based on the latency of multisensory effects and their precise anatomical localization. Still, due to inherent methodological limitations, direct evidence of the precise mechanisms by which multisensory integration occurs within human sensory cortices is lacking. Using intracranial recordings in epileptic patients ( n = 5 ) undergoing presurgical evaluation, we investigated the neurophysiological basis of multisensory integration in visual cortex. Subdural electrical brain activity was recorded while patients performed a simple detection task of randomly ordered Auditory alone (A), Visual alone (V) and Audio–Visual stimuli (AV). We then performed time-frequency analysis: first we investigated each condition separately to evaluate responses compared to baseline, then we indexed multisensory integration using both the maximum criterion model (AV vs. V) and the additive model (AV vs. A+V). Our results show that auditory input significantly modulates neuronal activity in visual cortex by resetting the phase of ongoing oscillatory activity. This in turn leads to multisensory integration when auditory and visual stimuli are simultaneously presented.

Affiliations: 1: 1The Sheryl and Daniel R. Tishman Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Departments of Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, US; 2: 2Department of Neurological Surgery and Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, US

Investigations have traditionally focused on activity in the sensory cortices as a function of their respective sensory inputs. However, converging evidence from multisensory research has shown that neural activity in a given sensory region can be modulated by stimulation of other so-called ancillary sensory systems. Both electrophysiology and functional imaging support the occurrence of multisensory processing in human sensory cortex based on the latency of multisensory effects and their precise anatomical localization. Still, due to inherent methodological limitations, direct evidence of the precise mechanisms by which multisensory integration occurs within human sensory cortices is lacking. Using intracranial recordings in epileptic patients ( n = 5 ) undergoing presurgical evaluation, we investigated the neurophysiological basis of multisensory integration in visual cortex. Subdural electrical brain activity was recorded while patients performed a simple detection task of randomly ordered Auditory alone (A), Visual alone (V) and Audio–Visual stimuli (AV). We then performed time-frequency analysis: first we investigated each condition separately to evaluate responses compared to baseline, then we indexed multisensory integration using both the maximum criterion model (AV vs. V) and the additive model (AV vs. A+V). Our results show that auditory input significantly modulates neuronal activity in visual cortex by resetting the phase of ongoing oscillatory activity. This in turn leads to multisensory integration when auditory and visual stimuli are simultaneously presented.

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/content/journals/10.1163/187847612x648279
2012-01-01
2016-12-09

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